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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

how do you simplify sqaure roots (radicals)?

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    what kind of square roots are you specifically talking about? is it surds or what?

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i dont even know what that is, its like a regular one, you have to find a perfect square first to find it.

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    can you pls give an example

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    (radical sign)169, i know the answer is 13 but i have to simplfiy the square root

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    doesn't the square root have this thing in it

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I think we should do this on chat, its kinda hard this way...

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    cheergirl, what thing? lol

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    \[\sqrt{169}\] thats what it looks like

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    the answer is 13

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes, i know but i have to simplifiy it

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I really think 13 cannot be simplified..

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    the square root had to be simplified

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    This is what my book says: Simplifiy each square root. \[\sqrt{169}\]

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    simplifying just makes sense when you have expression with variables, e.g sqrt( cos^2(x)+sin^2(x)+1) , otherwise you jusr try to evaluate the square root of the numer, like in thes case, if the answer is not that easy, you could try thongs like this: sqrt(20) = sqrt(5*4) = 2*sqrt(5)

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    here lets try this one, i guess that one is hard.

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Simplifiy each square root: \[\sqrt{121}\]

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    11

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    how did you do that pentop?

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    what i mean is that simplifying means dealing with variables not with numbers, however, \[\sqrt{121}=11\]

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    well, 11e2=121

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    sorry, I meant 11squared =121..

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yeah there are some roots you ought to memorize 'cause they are too common

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i know that it is 11 but i have to simplifiy it, im so confused. i know how to solve them, i cant simplifiy with perfect squares though

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    simplifying the square root simply means doing the operation of taking the square or making sure that there are no perfect squares under the radical sign. so with your problem, 13 is the simplification of root 169.

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    exactly...

  26. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    but how can i show the work for that?

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    nevermind im not gonna do my homework lol

  28. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    The only way I can think of to show it is to factor what is under the radical into 11^2 and then the square root of something squared is just that, in this case 11

  29. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    \[\sqrt{121}\] = \[\sqrt{11 x 11}\] = 11

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