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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

how would you simplify a cubed root radical of 25 times the radical of 125

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ok, you have 25^(1/3) * 125^(1/2)?

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ok, so how are 25 and 125 related?

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Both divisible by 5 and 25?

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ok, cool, so 25 = 5^2 and 125 = 5^2

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    5^3, sorry

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    oh okay yeah

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    \[\sqrt[3]{25} \times \sqrt{125} = 25^{1/3} \times 125^{1/2} = 5^{2/3} \times 5^{3/2} = 5^{4/6} \times 5^{9/6} = 5^{13/6}\] Feel free to correct me, this is my first time using this equation maker.

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    omg it's too long for the page HAHA

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    what is the equation maker?

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    all right

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    the answer is 5^{13/6} sorry it's too long haha

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yeah, that's how to do it easily hrwhyhry

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    okay.. how on earth did you get that though?

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so you have 25=5^2, and 125=5^3....so you have (5^2)^(1/3) * (5^3)^(1/2)

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    you can then add the exponents...here: \[(5^2)^(1/3)\]

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ohhhhh oka

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    y mn

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    (5^2)^(1/3) --> the square (2) and the (1/3) and now add together, 2/3

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    okay thank you so much!

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so, you got it?

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i think soooo

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    now how would you do x-\[\sqrt[3]{3}\div \sqrt{12}\]

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    sorry its supposed to be the x- the 3 one

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ????

  26. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    just a second

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thank you :)

  28. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    \[(x-\sqrt[3]{3})/\sqrt{12}\]

  29. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    is that the problem? is it equal to something?

  30. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    no thats the problem. You only have to simplify it

  31. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ok

  32. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so what is sqrt(12)?

  33. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    what are factors of 12?

  34. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    the square root of 4 times the square root of 3?

  35. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    right on, so sqrt(4) is simple, sqrt(3) is good because the problem has 3^(1/3)

  36. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    is the answer 1 over x^1/6 times 2?

  37. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    1/(x^1/6 * 2)?

  38. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes

  39. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    \[(x-(3^{1/3}))/(2*(3^{1/2}))\]

  40. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i had that... i just dont kmow if u can get rid of the three

  41. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so you can separate x and -3^(1/3) because they have the same denominator and they are part of a subtraction operation

  42. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ok...

  43. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thank u for the help by the way

  44. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    first look at 3^(1/3) / (2 * (3^1/2))

  45. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    np

  46. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    can you simplify that? focus on the 3's

  47. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    u can divide 3 by 3 and get one right

  48. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    when you divide by exponents you and subtract the exponents from values with the same base

  49. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so 3^(1/3) / 3^(1/2) is 3^(1/3) * 3^-(1/2)...can you can add these exponents --> 1/3 = 2/6, 1/2 = 3/6, need to have similar fractions....so 2/6 - 3/6 = -1/6

  50. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so you have 3^(-1/6)

  51. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    which is 1/(3^1/6)

  52. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes and u have to bring it below the division sign since it is negative?>

  53. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yeah, like in the last message

  54. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    is the answer x over 3^1/6 *2

  55. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    wait, x-1

  56. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    (x-1)/(2*(3^1/6))

  57. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    \[(x-1)/(2*(3^1/6))\]

  58. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    \[(x-1)/(2*(3^{1/6}))\]

  59. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    how's that look?

  60. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Thank you sooo much! I think thats right.....

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