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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

How do you find the second partial derivative of f(x,y)=cos^2^xsin^2^y?

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    its impossible because the formula is wrong

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    his yes it is

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    were do you get asomthing like that lol

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    it's f(x,y)=cos(squared)xsin(squared)y

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    answer is 6

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    How did you get that??

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    easy you do not know

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    no that's why i'm asking... lol

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i can not tell you cuz ther is diff way to do it

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    and i do not know how he did it

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    okay thanks

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    whats the question

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    How do you find the second partial derivative of f(x,y)=cos(squared)xsin(squared)y?

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    with respect to what?

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    we start with fx, and fy, then we get fxx, fxy, fyx and fyy, notice that fxy = fyx

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    make me your fan and more information will come soon

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thanks lol

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ok with respect to what so you want all the partial derivatives? ok one sec

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    with respect to all of them lol

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i will do this on paper

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thanks a lot

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    didnt post?

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    how do do a partial derivative in respect to everything?

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    nope...

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    fx = sin^2 y * 2 cos x (-sin x), treat y as a constant

  26. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    then it is in respect to x

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes

  28. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thats first partial wrt to x , wrt means with respect to

  29. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    fy = cos^2 x * 2 sin y cos y (treat x as a constant)

  30. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    oh. ok

  31. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so what is so difficult about this?

  32. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I didn't know how to do it obviously...

  33. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    benito, not nice

  34. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Thanks cantorset!!!

  35. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    now we find fxx, fxy, fyx, and fyy

  36. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    whats cool, it turns out fxy = fyx always

  37. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i see

  38. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    first fundamental theorem of partial derivatives

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