A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • 5 years ago

someone please help. "the radius of a circle is increasing at a constant rate of 0.2 meters per second. in terms of (pie) what is the rate of increase in the area of the circle at the instant when the circumference of the circle is 20(pie) meters?

  • This Question is Closed
  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    You have the change in radius over time, dr/dt. You want the change in area over time, dA/dt. Think in terms of multiplying fractions: dr/dt = dA/dt times what? Well, the "what" must cancel the dA we don't want and introduce the dr we need. Thus we have dr/dt = dA/dt times dr/dA. Your task now is to find a formula that relates r and A (that should be easy). Solve for r and take the derivative with respect to A; that's dr/dA. Then just muliply as indicated at the top of this paragraph, using the value of r implied in the problem. Okay?

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    i'm still a little confused with this

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    You'll have to tell me where you're confused and why if you want more. This is several pages in your textbook and I can't type that much. :)

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    i understand the dr/dt. and the da/dt. i know i'm looking for da/dt. but the multiplying paRt confused me. A=(pie) R(squared) and the derivative of that isDa/Dt= 2(pie) Dr/Dt right? can i just plug in 0.2 which is Dr/Dt?

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    that way i get Da/Dt?

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Okay, I think I typed something backwards. Sorry. You want da/dt, right? So my equation should have said da/dt = dr/dt (known) times da/dr. If we can find da/dr, we're home free. Begin with a = pi r^2 and take the d/dr of both sides to get da/dr = 2 pi r (not quite what you have -- I'm applying d/dr, not d/dt). The 0.2 is dr/dt, as you said, and yes, you can plug that in. So multiply dr/dt (0.2) by 2 pi r (you'll need to calculate the correct r from the circumference given) and you're done. Good?

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok cool. i had that in mind but wasn't quite sure thanks for the reassurance. :)

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Good for you.

  9. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.