anonymous
  • anonymous
Which one is bigger, 5 3/4 or 5.825???
Mathematics
katieb
  • katieb
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anonymous
  • anonymous
So remember that with a mixed fraction, you can convert the fractional part to a decimal and just add. 3/4 as a decimal is 0.75, and 5+0.75=5.75. Should be easier to compare now :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
Can you explain this on a 5th grader's level?
anonymous
  • anonymous
It is due Monday!

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anonymous
  • anonymous
To compare the two kinds of numbers (mixed fraction and decimal), it's easier to have them both be in the same form. One way to do it in this case is to convert \(5\frac{3}{4}\) to a decimal. \(5\frac{3}{4}\) is the same as \(5+\frac{3}{4}\). Since 5 is already a decimal, all you have to do is convert \(\frac{3}{4}\) into a decimal. You can do this by plugging it in your calculator and finding the result is 0.75. Adding 5 and 0.75 gives you 5.75, so the question now becomes, is 5.75 bigger than 5.825, or not?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Oh!!! So 5.75 is bigger?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Well... what happens if you subtract 5.825 from 5.75?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Ummm, it is o.75?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Right?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Not quite. Let's take a step back. What happens if you subtract five from 5.75? Remember that 5 is the same as 5.00 (the zeros after the decimal don't matter), so it's the same as: \[ \begin{align*} 5&.75 -5&.00 \end{align*} \]
anonymous
  • anonymous
\[ \begin{align} 5&.75\\ -5&.00 \end{align} \]
anonymous
  • anonymous
75?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Don't forget to drop down the decimal point!
anonymous
  • anonymous
so .75?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Exactly. Now what happens if you subtract 5 from 5.825?
anonymous
  • anonymous
If you're having trouble, do the same thing I did above. This would look like: \[ \begin{align} 5&.825\\ -5&.000 \end{align} \] Since the 0s don't matter again.
anonymous
  • anonymous
825?
anonymous
  • anonymous
The poor decimal point got left out again :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
sorry!
anonymous
  • anonymous
What do I do now?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Now you've got 0.825 and 0.75. Can you see which of those is bigger?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yes. 0.825!
anonymous
  • anonymous
Excellent! Now, you subtracted 5 from both 5.825 and from 5.75 to get 0.825 and 0.75. So since 0.825 is bigger than 0.75, what does that say about which one is bigger between 5.825 and 5.75?
anonymous
  • anonymous
5.825 is bigger than 5 3/4?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Right?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yes! Sorry, went away for a bit.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Can you help me some more?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Sure.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Thanks!
anonymous
  • anonymous
How do add fractions?
anonymous
  • anonymous
hello?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Okay, to add fractions you need to make sure they have the same denominator. Can you give me two example ones you need to add?
anonymous
  • anonymous
1/2 and 5/9? I have to write it as a mixed number in simplest form.
anonymous
  • anonymous
You are a great toutor :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
Okay. So like I said, the first step is making sure they have the same denominator. To do that, first you have to understand that if I multiply a fraction by a number over itself, then it stays the same. So, as an example, if I were to multiply a fraction by \(\frac{3}{3}\) or \(\frac{5}{5}\) or \(\frac{9}{9}\), then it would stay the same. Are you clear with that?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Nope! I am only in 5th grade.
anonymous
  • anonymous
So what do you get if you divide two by two?
anonymous
  • anonymous
1?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Exactly. And if you divide three by three, or four by four, or 17 by 17, you still get one, right?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Correct!
anonymous
  • anonymous
The next step....
anonymous
  • anonymous
Awesome. And what happens if you multiply a number by one?
anonymous
  • anonymous
The same number.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Does this have something to do with fractions?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Sorry, that was rude :(
anonymous
  • anonymous
Can you please contuine?
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm sorry, my Internet died :/ If you still want help, I'm willing to continue now that it's back up.

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