A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • 5 years ago

Which one is bigger, 5 3/4 or 5.825???

  • This Question is Closed
  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    So remember that with a mixed fraction, you can convert the fractional part to a decimal and just add. 3/4 as a decimal is 0.75, and 5+0.75=5.75. Should be easier to compare now :)

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Can you explain this on a 5th grader's level?

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    It is due Monday!

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    To compare the two kinds of numbers (mixed fraction and decimal), it's easier to have them both be in the same form. One way to do it in this case is to convert \(5\frac{3}{4}\) to a decimal. \(5\frac{3}{4}\) is the same as \(5+\frac{3}{4}\). Since 5 is already a decimal, all you have to do is convert \(\frac{3}{4}\) into a decimal. You can do this by plugging it in your calculator and finding the result is 0.75. Adding 5 and 0.75 gives you 5.75, so the question now becomes, is 5.75 bigger than 5.825, or not?

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Oh!!! So 5.75 is bigger?

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Well... what happens if you subtract 5.825 from 5.75?

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Ummm, it is o.75?

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Right?

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Not quite. Let's take a step back. What happens if you subtract five from 5.75? Remember that 5 is the same as 5.00 (the zeros after the decimal don't matter), so it's the same as: \[ \begin{align*} 5&.75 -5&.00 \end{align*} \]

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \[ \begin{align} 5&.75\\ -5&.00 \end{align} \]

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    75?

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Don't forget to drop down the decimal point!

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so .75?

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Exactly. Now what happens if you subtract 5 from 5.825?

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    If you're having trouble, do the same thing I did above. This would look like: \[ \begin{align} 5&.825\\ -5&.000 \end{align} \] Since the 0s don't matter again.

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    825?

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    The poor decimal point got left out again :)

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    sorry!

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    What do I do now?

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Now you've got 0.825 and 0.75. Can you see which of those is bigger?

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Yes. 0.825!

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Excellent! Now, you subtracted 5 from both 5.825 and from 5.75 to get 0.825 and 0.75. So since 0.825 is bigger than 0.75, what does that say about which one is bigger between 5.825 and 5.75?

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    5.825 is bigger than 5 3/4?

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Right?

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Yes! Sorry, went away for a bit.

  26. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Can you help me some more?

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Sure.

  28. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Thanks!

  29. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    How do add fractions?

  30. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    hello?

  31. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Okay, to add fractions you need to make sure they have the same denominator. Can you give me two example ones you need to add?

  32. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    1/2 and 5/9? I have to write it as a mixed number in simplest form.

  33. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    You are a great toutor :)

  34. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Okay. So like I said, the first step is making sure they have the same denominator. To do that, first you have to understand that if I multiply a fraction by a number over itself, then it stays the same. So, as an example, if I were to multiply a fraction by \(\frac{3}{3}\) or \(\frac{5}{5}\) or \(\frac{9}{9}\), then it would stay the same. Are you clear with that?

  35. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Nope! I am only in 5th grade.

  36. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    So what do you get if you divide two by two?

  37. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    1?

  38. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Exactly. And if you divide three by three, or four by four, or 17 by 17, you still get one, right?

  39. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Correct!

  40. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    The next step....

  41. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Awesome. And what happens if you multiply a number by one?

  42. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    The same number.

  43. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Does this have something to do with fractions?

  44. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Sorry, that was rude :(

  45. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Can you please contuine?

  46. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I'm sorry, my Internet died :/ If you still want help, I'm willing to continue now that it's back up.

  47. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.