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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

A prize wheen with a equal sectors numbered from 0 to 36 is spun 400 times. A prime number is the outcome 125 times. a) what is the theoreticcal probability of spinning a prime number? b) In 400 spins, how many times would you expect a prime number to occur ? c) compare your answer to part a) and part b) 4:59 pm

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ok so first question is, how many numbers are prime in 0 through 36?

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i dont even know

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31

  4. bahrom7893
    • 5 years ago
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    1,2,3,5,7,11,13,17,1..aww u bet me to it lol

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    haha it's all good :p, took me a while

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    1 is not prime

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    is it will be 11/ 36?

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so if there are 11 prime numbers between 0 and 36, what is the probability of a single spin landing on a prime number?

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    probability = (possibilities of a prime)/(total number of possibiliies)

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    11/36?

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    close! one problem is 0-36 is actually 37 numbers, since zero counts too :p

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so 11/37 is the answer to a

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so how do you think you get the answer to b?

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    oo waittt

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    well

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    in 400 spins

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i dont kno

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    well, if I told you to flip a coin twice, how many times would you expect it lands heads, and how many times tails?

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    1 head or 1 tails .. lol

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    exactly - and the same principle applies here

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so the probability of a coin landing heads is 1/2, since there are two sides, and heads is only one of them

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so if you flipped it twice, you'd expect 1/2 * 2 heads to show up

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so 1 head, and 1 tail

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so now if the probability of spinning a prime is 11/37, how many primes would you expect to spin if you spun 400 times?

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    it's the same thing "probability of it happening once" x "number of attempts"

  26. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so 11/37 * 400

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    okay i get it

  28. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so you would expect 118.92 primes

  29. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    484/37

  30. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    you forgot a zero on the top

  31. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    11/37 x 400 = (400*11)/37 = 118.92

  32. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so you would expect to spin 119 or so prime numbers

  33. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    that's less than the 125 that were spun in the problem example - but within reason

  34. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so part (c) is - that person spun more primes than you'd expect, but not unreasonably so

  35. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    how did you even get 118.92?

  36. sasogeek
    • 5 years ago
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    just chipping in if yo don't mind... my msn got messed up. fixed now :)

  37. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    go for it =)

  38. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ok i get it :)

  39. sasogeek
    • 5 years ago
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    though i can't answer this question now, looks like its already solved but i'll try it on my own :)

  40. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    A card is chosen from a deck of cards, recorded, and then replaced. this is done 75 times and red card from 5 to 9 is chosen 21 times. a) what is the theoretical probability of a red card between 5 and 9 being chosen? b) how many times would you expect this event to happen in 75 trials? c) compare your answers to part a) and b)

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