anonymous
  • anonymous
A prize wheen with a equal sectors numbered from 0 to 36 is spun 400 times. A prime number is the outcome 125 times. a) what is the theoreticcal probability of spinning a prime number? b) In 400 spins, how many times would you expect a prime number to occur ? c) compare your answer to part a) and part b) 4:59 pm
Mathematics
schrodinger
  • schrodinger
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.

Get this expert

answer on brainly

SEE EXPERT ANSWER

Get your free account and access expert answers to this
and thousands of other questions

sandra
  • sandra
ok so first question is, how many numbers are prime in 0 through 36?
anonymous
  • anonymous
i dont even know
sandra
  • sandra
2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.

More answers

bahrom7893
  • bahrom7893
1,2,3,5,7,11,13,17,1..aww u bet me to it lol
sandra
  • sandra
haha it's all good :p, took me a while
anonymous
  • anonymous
1 is not prime
anonymous
  • anonymous
is it will be 11/ 36?
sandra
  • sandra
so if there are 11 prime numbers between 0 and 36, what is the probability of a single spin landing on a prime number?
sandra
  • sandra
probability = (possibilities of a prime)/(total number of possibiliies)
anonymous
  • anonymous
11/36?
sandra
  • sandra
close! one problem is 0-36 is actually 37 numbers, since zero counts too :p
sandra
  • sandra
so 11/37 is the answer to a
sandra
  • sandra
so how do you think you get the answer to b?
anonymous
  • anonymous
oo waittt
anonymous
  • anonymous
well
anonymous
  • anonymous
in 400 spins
anonymous
  • anonymous
i dont kno
sandra
  • sandra
well, if I told you to flip a coin twice, how many times would you expect it lands heads, and how many times tails?
anonymous
  • anonymous
1 head or 1 tails .. lol
sandra
  • sandra
exactly - and the same principle applies here
sandra
  • sandra
so the probability of a coin landing heads is 1/2, since there are two sides, and heads is only one of them
sandra
  • sandra
so if you flipped it twice, you'd expect 1/2 * 2 heads to show up
sandra
  • sandra
so 1 head, and 1 tail
sandra
  • sandra
so now if the probability of spinning a prime is 11/37, how many primes would you expect to spin if you spun 400 times?
sandra
  • sandra
it's the same thing "probability of it happening once" x "number of attempts"
sandra
  • sandra
so 11/37 * 400
anonymous
  • anonymous
okay i get it
sandra
  • sandra
so you would expect 118.92 primes
anonymous
  • anonymous
484/37
sandra
  • sandra
you forgot a zero on the top
sandra
  • sandra
11/37 x 400 = (400*11)/37 = 118.92
sandra
  • sandra
so you would expect to spin 119 or so prime numbers
sandra
  • sandra
that's less than the 125 that were spun in the problem example - but within reason
sandra
  • sandra
so part (c) is - that person spun more primes than you'd expect, but not unreasonably so
anonymous
  • anonymous
how did you even get 118.92?
sasogeek
  • sasogeek
just chipping in if yo don't mind... my msn got messed up. fixed now :)
sandra
  • sandra
go for it =)
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok i get it :)
sasogeek
  • sasogeek
though i can't answer this question now, looks like its already solved but i'll try it on my own :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
A card is chosen from a deck of cards, recorded, and then replaced. this is done 75 times and red card from 5 to 9 is chosen 21 times. a) what is the theoretical probability of a red card between 5 and 9 being chosen? b) how many times would you expect this event to happen in 75 trials? c) compare your answers to part a) and b)

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.