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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

can someone help me with this(3/4)^-1+(2/3)

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Do I distribute the -1 into the fraction?

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    how do I view the reply?

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I would bvery grateful if some one can help me become fimilar with this site. It seem like it can help a ton of people. I was wondering if someone could tell me how the view the replies?

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Hello! So whenever you have something to the negative one power, like what you have, this is (in your case) indicating that you can "flip" whatever is on the numerator to the denominator or vice versa. So technically with your problem you would first distribute the negative one like so: (3^-1)/(4^-1)+2/3 So then using what I said previously, it will now look like this 4/3+2/3 I leave the rest up to you :D.

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so I have \[4/3+2/3=6/3=2\]

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Exactly. So did you understand how you would do the process if you got another problem similar to this one, say (2^-1)/5+3/10?

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    No how did you get the 4/3

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Okay so you know how I said you could distribute the -1, let's start from there. So we have (3^-1)/(4^-1). Now the 3 in the numerator, since it is to the power of the negative one, can now be flipped to the denominator. So we have: 1/(3*(4)^-1). So we took care of the three, because once you flip it, the negative sign can go away. Now time to take care of the 4^-1. Since it is in the denominator and 4 is to the power of negative one, we can flip the four to the numerator (but be sure to leave the three, that is no longer to a negative power, alone). So now we have 4/3. Did that help a little more?

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Yes a ton thank you

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    So for the example that I typed what would you think you should do first?

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ^mistype: what do you think you should do first**

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    would I go (2^-1)/(4^-1)/5+3?10 ??? Then

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ???

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    So here is the original: (2^-1)/5+3/10 I would first look at how only the negative two is to the negative power.

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    So that is the only one that will be changing locations, so to speak. :D

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so I would have (2^-1)(3^-1)+3/10

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    will that give me 3/5 + 3/10?

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I get it hold on

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Not quite.

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    5/2 + 3/5+ = 8/7 is this right

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    (2^-1)/5+3/10 So I would only flip the 2 to the denominator. So since multiplication is the opposite of division we will have 1 in the numerator of the fraction and 2*5 on the denominator in the first fraction. In otherwords, 1/(2*5)+3/10

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so i will have 1/10 + 3/10 =3/10

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    1+3=?

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    sorry Im adding 4

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    4/20

  26. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    which is 5

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    late night sorry. I really appricate you haelping me out.

  28. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    late night sorry. I really appricate you haelping me out.

  29. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Close again. It's actually 4/10 (you only add stuff in the numerator if the denominator is the same number).

  30. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    No Problem, by the way.

  31. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    that is true I forgot about that

  32. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    So key things to keep in mind. Numbers where some number in the numerator is to the -1 power like 4^-1 will equal 1/4. Numbers like 1/(6^-1) where the number is in the denominator will equal 6.

  33. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thanks for the tip

  34. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Mhm. I hope that helped you a little.

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