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he66666

  • 5 years ago

Determine f(x) = [(x-7)^9]/12 using the derivative rules. I don't get his question because the constant 12 in the denominator confuses me when using the product rule.. please help

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  1. bahrom7893
    • 5 years ago
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    just take it out.. its a constant u can ignore it and at the end add it again..

  2. bahrom7893
    • 5 years ago
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    do it like 1/12 times derivative of the rest..

  3. bahrom7893
    • 5 years ago
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    1/12 times 9(x-7)^8

  4. bahrom7893
    • 5 years ago
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    (3/4)(x-7)^8

  5. he66666
    • 5 years ago
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    our teacher told us that we should put 12 as a negative exponent, so 12^(-1) and use the product rule.. :S

  6. bahrom7893
    • 5 years ago
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    u can't do that... its not 12x is it?

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    You CAN do that, but it's not a good way to do it. Just remember that 12^(-1) is still a constant, so its derivative is 0.

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    The best bet with constant multipliers, like your 1/12, is to do as bahrom says -- hide the constant, take the derivative of what's left, then put the constant back.

  9. he66666
    • 5 years ago
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    Oh i see. But if I do 12^(-1), does it make a difference if I do (12)^(-1) or 12^(-1) when in the equation?

  10. bahrom7893
    • 5 years ago
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    its the same thing but u wont use product rule for constants.. u probably copied the question wrong..

  11. bahrom7893
    • 5 years ago
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    ANY DIFFERENTIATION RULES ARE FOR VARIABLES OR FUNCTIONS WITH VARIABLES...

  12. he66666
    • 5 years ago
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    this question was on the test and I got it wrong :( after we got it back, she told us that we should use the product rule so yeah.. thanks guys :)

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Using product rule on 12^(-1) * (x - 7)^9 gives 0 * (x - 7)^9 + 12^(-1) * 9(x - 7)^8 (and then simplify). It works, but why would you go to the extra trouble?

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