A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • 5 years ago

I am helping my daughter with her math. We are working on solving inequalities. our problem is like this, 2x+1>3; 1 I have a basic idea, but not sure how to show her how to show work.

  • This Question is Closed
  1. radar
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \[2x+1>3\]

  2. radar
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    subtract 1 from both sides as if it was a regular equality equation. 2x>3-1 or 2x>2 divide both sides by 2 giving the answer x>1 if you divide by or multiply by a 1 change the direction of the inequality. did not have to in this problem, always check your results

  3. radar
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I meant to say a minus 1!!

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    give me min to review

  5. radar
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    when multiplying both sides by a negative change the direction of the inequality sign. Hope this did not confuse you

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    The directions say to decide whether the given number is a solution of the inequality

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    im still reviewing it. Im slow to understand math.

  8. radar
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    No the given number shown as a 1 is not larger it actually equals 3

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    but the x = 1?

  10. radar
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    No look at my second post, x>1 not equal to one

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I dont see where you divided by 2. I see the rules but am confused

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so if the problem is 2x-1>3 you do it as if it were an equal sign so it be 2x-1=3 so you add one to the right side which will be 2x=4 so you divide by 2 which is x=2 but since it was a (>) its x>2 and since you didn't divide by a negative you don't chance the sign. i hope it helps

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    the problem said +1, but you subtract it?

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I am confused, I dont see any negative numbers.

  15. radar
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I divided both sides by 2 where it was 2x>2 2x/2 was on one side and 2/2 was on the other giving x>1

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    my bad so if its 2x+1>3 do it like an equal sign. 2x+1=3 so you subtract one to the right side which will make it 2x=2 so to leave the x by itself you divide by two. So it be x=1 but since you had(>) it be x>1

  17. radar
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Remember how you try to isolate the x on one side and have constants on the opposite side? If you subtract from one side you must subtract from the other side.

  18. radar
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I subtracted the 1 to isolate the unknown on one side.

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    2x+1>3;1 is the same as 2x-3=1

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    are you just dropping the +1

  21. radar
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    No, look carefully 2x+1>3 is the same as x>1

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    are you replacing the + with the >

  23. radar
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    No I am doing a series of steps that will solve the problem. Step 1 was to subtract 1 from both sides giving 2x>3-1 or 2x>2 You do see that on the left side 2x+1-1 = 2x

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok, thanks,

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    2x+1>3 -1 -1 2x>2 /2 /2 x>1 Thats the answer

  26. radar
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Good luck teaching your daughter

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    thanks, i need as much help as her LOL

  28. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.