A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • 5 years ago

How do you find horizontal asymptotes in calculus?

  • This Question is Closed
  1. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Hmmm.... i dont quite know what you are asking. Asymptotes tend to be stationary, and calulus deals with movement. "HA"s are found from the original function and tend to be limits of the function.

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Say for the question 2x/(x^2+9), what is the "calculus method" of getting the H.A.? There is something in my notes about dividing by the largest power and dividing the numerator by the denominator.

  3. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Dividing by the largest power is the algebra way. In calculus, you can derive another equation from the original to tell you how the original is affected by change; but that does not effect the "HA"s of the original equation in any way, nor does it help you to find them. For example, the HA of 2/x is y=0. But the derivative of (2/x) is -2/x^2 which doesnt help in finding the HA.

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Ok thanks! I have this example too that didn't make much sense: x+1 (divide by x) lim ---- x->infinite x-2 (divide by x) 1+1/x -->0 = lim ----- 1 - 2/x -->0 H.A. = 1

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Wait.. I know what its getting at but still.....

  6. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    There are 3 simple rules for finding HAs, but they are not calculus. They are just generalizations after doing quite a few algebra modifications.

  7. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    If the highest power of x is in the bottom; then the HA =0 If the highest power of x is the same in the top and bottom, the HA=the leading coeficients: example, 5x^2/7x^2. HA=5/7 If the highest power of x is found in the top; then the asymptote is a line or curve and not horizontal

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Ah that helps me out alot! Thank you for helping me :D

  9. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.