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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

solve the DE using exact method: [sin(xy) + xycos(xy)]dx + [1 + x^2cos(xy)]dy=0

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i know its exact I am getting stuck on doing the integral of Mdx

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Integration by parts on the xycos(xy) doesnt work?

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    it works but then i keep ending up having to do it several times over and over so something is wrong

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    k

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    k so for the integration by parts i got xsin(xy) + cos(xy)/y

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    take the integral of [1 + x^2cos(xy)} instead

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thats not what my rule says to do so i cant

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    believe me you can

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i know you can but my professor wont allow it

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i didnt get the same answer for the integration by parts

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    it would be the integral of x/ysin(xy)dx so i took out of the 1/y since its considered a constant so your left with xsin(xy)dx which requires IP again :(

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    take the integral of [1 + x^2cos(xy) with respect to y then take the ppartial with respect to t - do you see what I am saying -- you do it the same but opposite

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    then i would be using the h(y) as h(x) since i am using the complete opposite formula now

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i will figure it out that way...thanks

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    you will get \[y+ xsin(xy) \] this is the interal of [1 + x^2cos(xy) with respect to y then take the partial with respect to x

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yeh exactly what i got....thankss

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    dont forget your constant \[\phi(x)\]

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yupp

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    \[\phi(x)=0\] so the solution is y+xsin(xy)=c

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yup i got that...thanks so much

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    that is the good thing about exact form if you cant take the intergral of M try the integral of N

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yeh i am glad i know that now....only one more problem to go with this DE stuff and im done

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    where do you go to school

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    college of saint elizabeth....small womans college in nj

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spraguer (Moderator)
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