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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

what type of right triangle is this if: a=90, b=y+40, c=3y-10

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    im assuming a,b,and c are degrees. then b+c=90

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Well, no they are all side measurements

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    and also, i am figuring for y.

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    is a the hypotenuse?

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    no, c is.

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    then c^2 - b^2 = a^2

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    do that and the quadratic formula to solve for y

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Yes, the pythagorean theorem... and to tell the truth i have absolutely no idea what that means

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    what does "that" refer to?

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    "that" refers to do that and the quadratic formula to solve for y

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    just plug in everything you know into the pythagorean theorem. then rearrange what you get so that you can use the quadratic formula.

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    (3y-10)^2 - (y+40)^2 = 90^2

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    well.... i did the same thing except i used a squared plus b squared equals c squared

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    that works too

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    now just rearrange it all so that everything is on one side of the equation

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    okay but i dont come up with y being a perfect square.

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i tried this: a=90,b=y+40,c=3y-10 a2+b2=c2 squared=2 so 902+(y+40)2=(3y-10)2 8100+y2+1600=3y2+100 9700+y2=3y2+100 9600+y2=3y2=2y2+100 9600=2y2 4800=y2

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    you squared incorrectly. (y+40)^2 is y^2+80y+1600. same with (3y-10)^2, that was squared incorrectly too

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    how do you get 80y?

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    use the foil method.

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    please elaborate....

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    hmmm. write out (y+40)x(y+40). then distribute. so it becomes y*y + y*40 + 40*y + 40*40

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ooooohhhhh!!!! okay genius.... (in a good way) thank you so much!

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    lol no problem. by the way, the answer isn't a whole number.

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I'm in seventh grade honors and lets just say my teacher isnt exactly very to the point. and oh are you serious? so its not a perfect square?

  26. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    nope =(

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ohhh jeez. i was having a hard time the whole time because i thought it HAD to be a perfect square... :) whoops.

  28. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    lol.

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