A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • 5 years ago

How do you find the domain of the function P(x) = 10^x^2 + log(1-2x)

  • This Question is Closed
  1. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    since there is a logarithm in it; you have to limit the domain of "x" to values that make (1-2x)>0. Logarithms never reach 0 nor do they go negative so those values are meaningless. 1-2x>0 1>0+2x 1>2x 1>x flip it the whole thing around to read it easier and we get: x<1

  2. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    hit the wrong button lol x< (1/2)

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so the domain is 1/2?

  4. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    the domain is {x|x<(1/2)} in other words. x can be any value that is less than (1/2) another notation would be (-inf,(1/2)) think about it this way. In order for (1-2x) to be 0 (bad number; BAD number) "x" would have to be (1/2). Anything bigger than this would make (-2)(+number) = a negative number greater than 1. For instance: 1 - 2(1) = -1. Cant have negatives in the log function!!! log(-1) is strictly forbidden and is punishable by.... by.... well, something horrible I am sure. So, anything equal to and over (1/2) has got to be removed from the domain. That leaves everything less than (1/2) to negative infinity that CAN be used.

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Thanks! Do you do anything with 10 to the power of x^2?

  6. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    10^(x^2) has no limitations. In other words, the input value of an exponential function can be any "real" number and it will output a valid answer. But, because 10^(x^2) and log(1-2x) are sharing the same values for "x". We have to let log(1-2x) control what we can use as inputs. A domain tells us what values we can use for inputs in a function. Domain = Inputs. Make sense?

  7. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.