anonymous
  • anonymous
I know it is not a maths question, but I couldn't find a physics study group, so: An electric radiator which is an ordinary constant resistor emits a heating power of 750 W at a mains supply voltage of 230 V. What is the total heating power in each respective instance when two such radiators are connected a) in parallel, and b) in series to the 230 V supply voltage? i think i need to find the resistance of radiator first am I right?
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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katieb
  • katieb
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anonymous
  • anonymous
i found the resistance of each radiator to be 70.5333 ohms, but what do I do now?
anonymous
  • anonymous
You're right about the first part.
anonymous
  • anonymous
You next have to set up your circuit where each radiator is represented as a resistor.

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anonymous
  • anonymous
i did, i have drawings ow both cases, series and parallel
anonymous
  • anonymous
Whenever I see resistance, voltage and power, I think of the following:\[V=IR\]and\[P=IV\]Eliminate current as such\[I=V/R \rightarrow P =(V/R)V=\frac{V^2}{R}\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
The resistance here will be the effective resistance of the circuit. For the parallel case, \[\frac{1}{R}+\frac{1}{R}=\frac{1}{R_{eff}} \rightarrow R_{eff}=\frac{R}{2}\]and so to find the power for parallel:\[P=\frac{V^2}{R_{eff}}=\frac{V^2}{R/2}=\frac{2V^2}{R}\approx \frac{2 \times 230^2}{70.53}=1500W\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
For the series case, \[R+R=R_{eff} \rightarrow P=\frac{V^2}{R_{eff}}\approx \frac{230^2}{2 \times 70.53} \approx 375W\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
great, I understand it now! THANX, you are a leal lifesaver, i wish i could become your fan again
anonymous
  • anonymous
wait, let me create another account and fan you once more...
anonymous
  • anonymous
[thumbs up] :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
here I am
anonymous
  • anonymous
lol awesome
anonymous
  • anonymous
:( do not see the fan button :( something is wrong... w8 let me try some proxy manipulation...
anonymous
  • anonymous
I've heard people say they have to refresh the page or something...in any case, at least you have a cool login.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Ah...excellent!
anonymous
  • anonymous
yay, my little hack worked, appearently openstudy wont allow liking on a same user from one IP address, so i used some proxy server to do it
anonymous
  • anonymous
smart!
anonymous
  • anonymous
let me try again..
anonymous
  • anonymous
You know, I think there is something for physics on this openstudy site. I haven't checked properly, but I saw something about physics on the homepage. You have to load more or something...
anonymous
  • anonymous
click on more groups, and there's something callled physics classical openstudy something.
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes...that's it
anonymous
  • anonymous
^^

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