A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • 5 years ago

What are the possible values of the four quantum numbers for a 2p electron in boron?

  • This Question is Closed
  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    n is for the shell, l is subshell, ml is the subshell shape, and ms is the spin

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so i'll start it off

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    we're only looking at 2p

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so first: n=2, l=1, m=-1, and s=1/2

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    It can have a fourth quantum number s that be either +1/2 or -1/2...every shell (n number) has sub-shell (l number) oriented in one of the possible orientations (m number) that only allows two electrons with opposite magnetic spin (s number).

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    The neutral boron atom has the following shell configuration:\[[Ne]2s^{2}p^{1}\]2p corresponds to principle quantum number n=2 (2 in 2p), azimuthal quantum number l=1 (p in 2p). I'm almost positive that the choice of magnetic quantum number m and spin quantum number s are arbitrary in this case. To the extent the choice of m and s are arbitrary, any of the following work:\[n=2, l=1, m_{l}=-1, s=+1/2\]\[n=2, l=1, m_{l}=-1, s=-1/2\]\[n=2, l=1, m_{l}=0, s=+1/2\]\[n=2, l=1, m_{l}=0, s=-1/2\]\[n=2, l=1, m_{l}=1, s=+1/2\]\[n=2, l=1, m_{l}=1, s=-1/2\] I recall reading that by convention the lowest available m is assigned first, but +1/2 s electrons are assigned before -1/2 s electrons. I'm having trouble figuring out where I read that. In any case, all of this works out to exactly what BohrMachine posted, above: \[n=2, l=1, m_{l}=-1, s=+1/2\]

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I found my source. Lecture Notes #1 (LN-1), page 9, second paragraph after the bullet points. The Aufbau Principle.

  8. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.