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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

Prove that every positive even integer greater than or equal to 4 can be expressed as the sum of two primes.

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    You prove it.

  2. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    I cant even prove that even integers exist :)

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Actually I think the question is mistaken, it should have been Every positive even integer greater than 2 can be expressed as the sum of two primes

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Am I right Pasi?

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    You are ignorant

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    No that is how the problem is presented word to word.

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Googling: ignorant was kinda' right Also: "In 1930, Lev Schnirelmann proved that every even number n ≥ 4 can be written as the sum of at most 20 primes. This result was subsequently improved by many authors; currently, the best known result is due to Olivier Ramaré, who in 1995 showed that every even number n ≥ 4 is in fact the sum of at most six primes. In fact, resolving the weak Goldbach conjecture will also directly imply that every even number n ≥ 4 is the sum of at most four primes.[13] Leszek Kaniecki showed every odd integer is a sum of at most five primes, under Riemann Hypothesis. [14]"

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Then I don't have idea. For a moment I thought may be you were talking about Goldbach's conjecture. The statement I provided is Goldbach's conjecture. And it is not yet proved. If you don't mind, may I know the book, the problem is from

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    The name of this problem is strong Goldbach conjecture in my book.

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Yes, just as I said

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Then it is wrong, given there, as I know the statement which gave is the right statement

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I believe you are talking about the prolem in which number '1' is regarded as a prime. This convention is not used anymore in this version of the prolem.

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I meant the statement, that I gave is the right (sorry for the typos)

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Whatever it may be, it is a conjecture

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    You seem familiar with this here is some more detalied information from Wolfram mathworld: http://mathworld.wolfram.com/GoldbachConjecture.html

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Whatever it may be its a conjecture

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I woudn't have been sitting here if I would been able to prove a conjecture

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Bit odd of our lecturer to have this task included in our course paper. If someone here gets a spark to solve this it would be good though.

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    But Pasi, its a conjecture, it means it is yet not proven by anyone

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    How can you expect it to be proved by some one here

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Your lecturer is perhaps playing a little joke with you

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I don't really expect, but it cant do any harm either. I agree with the joke part now that I familiarized my self with the conjecture.

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    You will find something here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goldbach's_conjecture

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Hope thats helpful

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Considerable efforts seem to have been made to prove this conjeture and I'm sure someday it will be proved. Thank you for the link. Here is another one full of unsolved problems: http://garden.irmacs.sfu.ca/ This types of problems sure seem intriguing.

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