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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

what is depletion region in diodes???

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    the region between n-type and p-type semiconductor material in a p-n junction. i think the positive holes are filled by excess electrons from the n-type material...or something, ha. i could be wrong

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    free electrons*

  3. radar
    • 5 years ago
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    This is the small area at the junction of the two different semiconductor materials N and P This region is a electrically charged consisting primarily of ionized atoms with relatively few free electrons or holes.

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    radar, how does the gap form though?

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thanks u very much

  6. radar
    • 5 years ago
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    Laka, it is a quantum thing with the mobile electrons and holes be caught up in the valence bands ioniizingg the atoms, very similar to a small capacitor where applied bias will eight separate the plates further of bring them closer together depending on the polarity of the bias. the process is by diffusion.

  7. radar
    • 5 years ago
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    that eight is supposed to be either. lol

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    wait, bias just refers to the polarity of the voltage, right? ive havent learnt that term yet

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I*

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    nevermind, I googled it :) thanks

  11. radar
    • 5 years ago
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    bias is the external applied voltage and can be either forward bias or reverse bias depending on the polarity of the externally applied voltage.

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so from what i gathered, reverse bias occurs when the holes and free electrons are attracted to opposite ends of the semiconductor material, widening the depletion zone and stopping current flow? whereas forward bias is the opposite? like, there is a two way current flow: conventional current (positive holes) in one direction and an electron drift in the other? is this right

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thanks by the way, i zoned out in class when we were getting taught this

  14. radar
    • 5 years ago
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    It is a good field to get in but is changing very fast. Can'nt keep up lol

  15. radar
    • 5 years ago
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    I worked in radar with the FAA both as an electronic tech and electronic engineer.

  16. radar
    • 5 years ago
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    Thankfully I am now retirted and have been retired since 1994

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    true, it is a fast advancing field. and haha, i was born in 1994. we're doing semiconductors in physics and there are exams next week. but i doubt we have to know this much anyway

  18. radar
    • 5 years ago
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    Understand, good luck with it.

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