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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

I am going skydiving. If I jump from 15000 feet, what will be my speed at 1500 feet?

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    where are you skydiving for a start?

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    assuming it is Earth and assuming that acceleration due to gravity is constant (9.8) then you use v^2=u^2+2as

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    problema solved by @maths, dd you understand it saurav? ^_^

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    did*

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes, it is very important to know if it is earth or other planet, because the acceleration due to gravity is different in different places in the universe

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    that's true :)

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yeah thanks ... I would also need to convert my distance in meters first! It will be scary fast though!!

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    LOL! good luck :)

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    well, the formula wont help

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    you forgot resistance from air

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    which keeps increasing as your velocity is increasing

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    some relief to hear that!

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so, you got to use some extra formulas, and you got to know your surface area, and the friction index of your clothing material in relation to air

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    calculus wont hurt for exact calculations

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    well as the question does not explicitly say which model for air resistance is being used, i think it is logical to disregard air resistance unless you are a university level physicist

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    anyway, have fun, my friend did it a year back, while he was in Africa :) He sayed he almosed shi**d his pants.

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    But after landing, he was really happy.

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Can I not calculate some negative acceleration due to resistance? But how would I do that?

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I also want to do skydiving, but now i am busy with some piloting stuf

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    it would simply decrease your overall accelaration up to a point (terminal velocity) when your velocity is constant

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    cool @BecomeMyFan=D !

  22. radar
    • 5 years ago
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    Speed at 1500 feet will depend on your parachute. It better be open at 1500 feet!!! lol

  23. radar
    • 5 years ago
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    Hopefully slow enough to survive !!

  24. radar
    • 5 years ago
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    Truthfully with the parachute, you couldn't ignore air resistance. I think you would have to do this in two parts, first ignore the air resistance for the period the chute is not opened, then a new acelleration formula would be needed when chute is opened. There is a big change in acceleration when that chute pops.

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