A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • 5 years ago

(-4x^2y)^3 I really need help, I still don't understand.

  • This Question is Closed
  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \[ (-4x^{2y})^{3} is this what you mean?\]

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \[(ab^{c})^{d} = a^{d} b ^{cd}\]

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so it will be \[-4^{3}x ^{6y}\]

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    = -64x^6y

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    remember that y has an implicit exponent of 1, and 1*3 = 3.

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    no i meant (-4x to the second power than y)^3 the y is not part of the exponent

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    oh, so it's \[(-4x ^{2}y)^{?}\]

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    the concept is the same, -4^3 x^6 y^3

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    or -64x^6 y^3

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I think the question is :\[(-4x^2y)^3\] right?

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yes thats right, i just dont understand how to solve it

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    As I said, when raising a product to a power, you multiply the exponents of the factors. So the 3 would be multiplied to the power of the -4 factor, and the power of the x factor, and the power of the y factor.

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    alright, first of all you've got to mulitply the power 3 with the given between the brackets and you'll get ^_^: \[=(-4)^3 x^6 y^3 = 48x^6y^3\] is it clearer now ? :)

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \[(-4)^3 \ne 48 \] \[(-4)^3 = -64 \]

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    lol! sry >_< silly mistake , thank you polpak :)

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    do you understand it now courtney ^_^?

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    just substitute the power to each :)

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    just pass the power out to each*

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yes, kind of but there is another problem now that is in the same format but is a fraction and has that equal sign with a / through it. grr i hate math lol

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    don't say that, look at the problem , write it down on paper and try to use tha same concept like the one here :) The problem never gets harder, it just gets more detailed ^_^

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    nothing changes, just apply the same rule :)

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    The rule applies equally to division. The only part that gets messy is when you have a sum that you're raising to a power.

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    im trying to stay positive, thank you so much for your help you two are life savers! im writing all the work you just sent as my work shown but what part is the part that i put in the space for the answer to the problem?

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Try to see if you can figure it out from what we've said. We'll check your answer.

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    np :)

  26. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok im working it out now than ill post it on here, thank you again.

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \[(((3p ^{3}v ^{4} \ s ^{4}))^{2}\]

  28. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok this is a fraction the s^4 is on the bottom and it also says s with the equal sign / 0

  29. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    i got 9p^6y^8 over s^8

  30. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    So.. \[(3p^3v^4/s^4)^2, s \ne 0\]

  31. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Then yes, that is the correct answer. Good job!

  32. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yayyy thank you, even my professor cant teach me math and over the computer you got right into my head lol

  33. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    It may be somewhat helpful to expand the exponents for a while to see what is happening. \[(3p^3v^4/s^4)^2 = [(3pppvvvv)/(ssss)]^2 \] \[= [(3pppvvvv)(3pppvvvv)]/[(ssss)(ssss)]\] \[= [(3*3)ppppppvvvvvvvv]/[ssssssss]\] \[= 9p^6v^8/s^8\]

  34. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    that acutally helps alot, can i ask you on more question?

  35. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Of course!

  36. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok so i know how to do this in a normal way but they want it in exponential form and im confused. the first is (5^3)^3 and the next is in fraction form which is even worse lol (r/s)^6 (s\[\neq\]0)

  37. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    So try to expand it out. \[(5^3)^3 = (5^3)(5^3)(5^3)\] Now how would you expand that further?

  38. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    five times five times five than add the exponents?

  39. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \[5^3 = 5*5*5\] \[\rightarrow 5^3*5^3*5^3 = (5*5*5)*(5*5*5)*(5*5*5)\] \[=5^?\]

  40. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    5^9?

  41. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Yep.

  42. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    awesome now to the fraction, can you help me with that one?

  43. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Now we can see that the faster way to arrive at the same result would be to simply : \[(5^3)^3 = 5^{3*3} = 5^9\]

  44. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    okay so you multiply the exponents too?

  45. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Well, remember when we expanded it out, we said that we had three groups with three 5's each. So how many 5's do we have multiplied together? 3*3 right?

  46. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    right, im trying to keep up im just so lost

  47. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    So if you're not comfortable with multiplying the exponents, just try expanding the next one out for yourself. \[a^6 = a*a*a*a*a*a\] \[ \rightarrow (r/s)^6 =\ ?\]

  48. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    We'll just go one step at a time.

  49. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    would i seperate them and do r*r*r*r*r*r and s*s*s*s*s*s?

  50. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    No, just multiply the whole thing.

  51. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so r/s*r/s*r/s*r/s*r/s*r/s

  52. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Yes, but keep the parens so it's more readable. \[(r/s)*(r/s)*(r/s)*(r/s)*(r/s)*(r/s)\] And when we multiply two fractions, we do what?

  53. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    top times top bottom times bottom?

  54. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yep

  55. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so its (r^6)/(s^6)

  56. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Yes. And here again we can arrive at this answer in a more direct way once we understand the process \[ (r/s)^6 = (r^1/s^1)^6 = r^{1*6}/s^{1*6} = r^6/s^6\]

  57. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    that would be the answer correct since we do not have the values for r and s? what about the =/ thing?

  58. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    They have to make the restriction \[s \ne 0\] because if s is 0 then you're dividing by 0 which is not defined. That answer is correct regardless of what r and s is. If we know more about them we might be able to simplify further (if s was 2 and r was 4 for example). But even in that case our answer is correct. It just might not be in the form they're looking for.

  59. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yayyy you are so amazing and kind hearted. that you so so much!

  60. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    You're very welcome.

  61. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.