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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

please help

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    You have 4 triangles, all of equal size, and only one is shaded. What can you conclude now?

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    From that picture, you see that the large triangle is divided into 4 equal sections. 1 of those sections is shaded, so the probability that a point would land on it is 1/4, which is 25 percent...(4 quarters = $1)

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    This is the 4th problem of this nature you've posted in the last 2 days. If you're not going to attempt to learn this principle, why continue in math at all? If you are actually interested in learning, please ask a question about the problem rather than just scanning the problem in and waiting till you get the answer.

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    dont reply if you dont wanna help..

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thank you for the two people who did help

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    If it's just telling you the answer, it's not help. It's help if it's nudging you in the right direction.

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I am helping you. I'm helping you make better life choices than wasting your time in a math course you have no intention of learning from. If you want to learn, great! If not, great! But make the decision either way, don't waste several hours in classes and doing homework only to walk away from the class knowing just as much as you did when you entered it.

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i dont go to a regular school.. i dont want to know this pellet but i have to get credit in the class to graduate

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    You have one equilateral traingle with the same size adjacent and opposite angles. There are four triangles of equal dimensions inside of the EQUILATERAL traingle. Notice how I place emphasis on EQUILATERAL. You have one, out of the four same triangles shaded and you want to know the percentage probability of a point landing in the shaded triangle. Percentage is based on real numbers 1-100. Divide 100 by 4. From there, you can postulate your percentage probability.

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    okay thank you

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    No problem. =)

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