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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

What do I with this?

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    \[\sqrt{1/3}\]

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    What do I do with this?

  3. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    its fine the way it is; or we can move things around to make it "look" different but still have the same value..

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i want to simplify it but it's already done

  5. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    most textbooks will want you to make it in the form: sqrt(3)/3

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    \[\sqrt{1/3}\] \[\times\] \[\sqrt{3/3}\] = \[\sqrt{3}\]/3

  7. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    that radical sign can be split so that it is over each number individually like this: sqrt(1) ------ sqrt(3)

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    amistre is right...

  9. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    sqrt(1) = 1 ------ sqrt(3) = sqrt(3) now most textbooxs HATE to have a radical in the bottom of a fraction so they work on it some more..

  10. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    we multiply this fraction by a convient form of (1); because anything times (1) equals itself. Lets use sqrt(3)/sqrt(3) 1 sqrt(3) sqrt(3) ------ (x) ------ (=) -------- sqrt(3) sqrt(3) 3

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    heres the problem \[2\sqrt{3}+\sqrt{27}-\sqrt{1/3}\] so I simplified it to 2*1.7+5.2-1.7

  12. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    ahhhh, then we need all like "radicals" to act like variables: lets change sqrt(27) to look into something that has a sqrt(3) attached to it: do you know how?

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    no

  14. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    lets see if we can find some numbers that will help us out with that "27" We should know by now that 3 times 9 = 27: 3(9) = 27 also: 3*3*3 = 27 Do you know how to use this knowledge to your advantage?

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    the solution is: 2 sqrt 3 + 3 sqrt 3 - sqrt 3/3 time it to 3 =6 sqrt 3 + 9 sqrt 3 - sqrt 3 =14 sqrt 3 thats the answer

  16. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    tian: very good :)

  17. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    JAPAN: what can we do to: sqrt(3*3*3) to make it look like ___ sqrt(3)? Do you know?

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    @amistre thanks but Ur answer is more complete...:-)

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so \[3\sqrt{3}\]?

  20. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    Yes, that is correct. But it is important that you understand HOW you got it. Which if you already know, then great :)

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    three 3's multiplied together equal 27 which is how we simplify it

  22. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    yes, and what alloed us to pull that "3" out from under the radical? Do you know?

  23. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    **allowed

  24. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    3*3 = 9 means: 3^2 = 9 we also know that the sqrt(9) = 3 if we put these facts together, we notice a rule or pattern: sqrt(9) = sqrt(3^2) = 3 What allowe us to turn sqrt(3*3*3) into 3sqrt(3) is this "rule" sqrt(3^2 3) = sqrt(3^2) sqrt(3) = 3sqrt(3) Does that make sense?

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes

  26. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    Once you know that, the rest is pretty simple. So your equation becomes: 2 sqrt(3) + 3 sqrt(3) - (1/3) sqrt(3) We can add all these together now and treat that "sqrt(3)" as tho it was a normal variable like "x" or "y". Does that make sense?

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes thank you

  28. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    youre welcome :)

  29. radar
    • 5 years ago
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    the solution is: 2 sqrt 3 + 3 sqrt 3 - sqrt 3/3 time it to 3 =6 sqrt 3 + 9 sqrt 3 - sqrt 3 =14 sqrt 3 thats the answer This answer omitted the denominator for the last term, the answer at the end of the posts was the correct "final" answer

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