anonymous
  • anonymous
What do I with this?
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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katieb
  • katieb
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anonymous
  • anonymous
\[\sqrt{1/3}\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
What do I do with this?
amistre64
  • amistre64
its fine the way it is; or we can move things around to make it "look" different but still have the same value..

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anonymous
  • anonymous
i want to simplify it but it's already done
amistre64
  • amistre64
most textbooks will want you to make it in the form: sqrt(3)/3
anonymous
  • anonymous
\[\sqrt{1/3}\] \[\times\] \[\sqrt{3/3}\] = \[\sqrt{3}\]/3
amistre64
  • amistre64
that radical sign can be split so that it is over each number individually like this: sqrt(1) ------ sqrt(3)
anonymous
  • anonymous
amistre is right...
amistre64
  • amistre64
sqrt(1) = 1 ------ sqrt(3) = sqrt(3) now most textbooxs HATE to have a radical in the bottom of a fraction so they work on it some more..
amistre64
  • amistre64
we multiply this fraction by a convient form of (1); because anything times (1) equals itself. Lets use sqrt(3)/sqrt(3) 1 sqrt(3) sqrt(3) ------ (x) ------ (=) -------- sqrt(3) sqrt(3) 3
anonymous
  • anonymous
heres the problem \[2\sqrt{3}+\sqrt{27}-\sqrt{1/3}\] so I simplified it to 2*1.7+5.2-1.7
amistre64
  • amistre64
ahhhh, then we need all like "radicals" to act like variables: lets change sqrt(27) to look into something that has a sqrt(3) attached to it: do you know how?
anonymous
  • anonymous
no
amistre64
  • amistre64
lets see if we can find some numbers that will help us out with that "27" We should know by now that 3 times 9 = 27: 3(9) = 27 also: 3*3*3 = 27 Do you know how to use this knowledge to your advantage?
anonymous
  • anonymous
the solution is: 2 sqrt 3 + 3 sqrt 3 - sqrt 3/3 time it to 3 =6 sqrt 3 + 9 sqrt 3 - sqrt 3 =14 sqrt 3 thats the answer
amistre64
  • amistre64
tian: very good :)
amistre64
  • amistre64
JAPAN: what can we do to: sqrt(3*3*3) to make it look like ___ sqrt(3)? Do you know?
anonymous
  • anonymous
@amistre thanks but Ur answer is more complete...:-)
anonymous
  • anonymous
so \[3\sqrt{3}\]?
amistre64
  • amistre64
Yes, that is correct. But it is important that you understand HOW you got it. Which if you already know, then great :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
three 3's multiplied together equal 27 which is how we simplify it
amistre64
  • amistre64
yes, and what alloed us to pull that "3" out from under the radical? Do you know?
amistre64
  • amistre64
**allowed
amistre64
  • amistre64
3*3 = 9 means: 3^2 = 9 we also know that the sqrt(9) = 3 if we put these facts together, we notice a rule or pattern: sqrt(9) = sqrt(3^2) = 3 What allowe us to turn sqrt(3*3*3) into 3sqrt(3) is this "rule" sqrt(3^2 3) = sqrt(3^2) sqrt(3) = 3sqrt(3) Does that make sense?
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes
amistre64
  • amistre64
Once you know that, the rest is pretty simple. So your equation becomes: 2 sqrt(3) + 3 sqrt(3) - (1/3) sqrt(3) We can add all these together now and treat that "sqrt(3)" as tho it was a normal variable like "x" or "y". Does that make sense?
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes thank you
amistre64
  • amistre64
youre welcome :)
radar
  • radar
the solution is: 2 sqrt 3 + 3 sqrt 3 - sqrt 3/3 time it to 3 =6 sqrt 3 + 9 sqrt 3 - sqrt 3 =14 sqrt 3 thats the answer This answer omitted the denominator for the last term, the answer at the end of the posts was the correct "final" answer

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