A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • 5 years ago

int(int(6xy^3 x=y..1) y=0..1) dxdy

  • This Question is Closed
  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Is your problem\[\int\limits_{0}^{1}\int\limits_{y}^{1}6xy^3dxdy\]?

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yes it is

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Okay, just give me a sec to do something non-mathematical. I can help you.

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok, cool. i got 1/4, can you tell me if that's right? when ever you're done though

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Okay...I scratched it out and got 1/4 too. You know what you're doing.

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yeah but i'm have a problem with another one...is it ok to ask you one more?

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    sure

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok it's another double...int(int(5sin(x+y) x=0..pi/2) y=0..pi/2) dxdy

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I got 10. Is that what you got?

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    i keep getting stuck...this is the third time trying to do it again

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    It might be easier for me to scan what I did and attach then write it out...have a look through if and ask questions.

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    perfect thanks

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Everything under the red line.

    1 Attachment
  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    sorry im comparing right now...

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    That's okay. I'll be online for a while. Just post when you're ready. If I don't respond 'immediately', I'm away from the computer.

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok i see it

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I think you're getting trapped by not just accepting that the other variable is just a constant when you integrate over the other in a double integral.

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    your fourth step is different from mine. i dont understand how you went from cos (pi/2 + y) to it becoming sin y

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    We get very used to thinking of x and y as things that vary, rather than stand still.

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    You can use the double angle formula. You'll see I did that expansion in the top right corner (under the red line).

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \[\cos(\frac{\pi}{2}+y)=\cos \frac{\pi}{2}\cos y - \sin \frac{\pi}{2}\sin y\]\[=0 \times \cos y + (- 1) \times \sin y=-\sin y\]

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    thank you so much. i would have never remembered that rule

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    no probs.

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    when you're done and you're satisfied, it'd be great if you could click the 'become a fan' link :)

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    just did it

  26. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    cheers

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so you're getting the same answer?

  28. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yes, after remembering the rule it all made sense

  29. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    good.

  30. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.