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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

Go to this site: http://tutorial.math.lamar.edu/Classes/CalcIII/Limits.aspx Check out example c, explain to me how and why he gets 0 in the first 2 limits when he has a situation of 0/x^4 and 0/y^4 where x and y goes to 0.

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Come on, it's saturday night, you dont go out and do stuff, you do math stuff instead... :P

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Over here, it's actually early Saturday afternoon...lol. Based on what he says, I think he's saying "As x approaches 0, it's 0, and as y approaches 0, it's 0, but let's look at how they both approach 0 at the same time." And by approaching how they both approach zero at the same time, you can see how the function behaves along the line y=x. Now, if you analyze it along y=x, you can substitute x for each y in the function, and you end up getting x^4/4x^4 - which simplifies to 1/4.

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    It's kinda awkward to describe in words, but does it make sense conceptually?

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    makes sense to me

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    It sure makes sense at that approach, but he approaches it at 2 other ways in the same example, all 3 are necessary to evaluate the limit at that point. I do fully understand that 3rd way which you described, but the question as said is the first 2 approaches. Anyone who understand those? lim (x,0) -> (0,0) and lim (0,y) -> (0,0)

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