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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

given a graph how do you identify intervals on which f''(x) < 0

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    this is a second derivative.

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    im looking at a graph however, i dont know how to calculate the intervals on which f''(x) <0

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    is this an ad?

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    from sammi i think so. i cant afford to pay for help

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    im just trying to get help on my homework

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    we students may suffer from the budget tension.

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yeah sammi but it cost

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    you can earn money by answering questions there too!

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    accordingly there are people who pay the money.

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    anyway ken could you help me figure this problem out?

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    you can do the first derivative , and then do the second.

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    for example, suppose f(x)=x^3+6x^2+4x+3 then f'(x)=3x^2+12x+4 f''(x)=6x+12

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    how to i find the first der. from the graph

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    If you have a graph of f, you look at the places on the graph where the concavity is negative (curve opens downward). This will be the places where the second derivative is negative.

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    back up a little bit, do you know the basic derivatives?

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    polpak is right, but it is just perceiving by eyes, not calculating

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    if i have numbers i can find der., but there is only letters

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    to see where the first derivative is negative you look to see where the slope of the tangent to the graph points downward as x moves positively..

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    it's the same.

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    im not understanding

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    f'(x) stands for the slope of the tangent line at (x,f(x)). f''(x) stands for the change of the slope.

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I presume you have some graph of a function, and you need to identify where the second derivative of the function is less than 0

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i do have a graph so where it is sloping below 0

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Is the graph of f, or of f'' ?

  26. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    suppose f(x)=ax^3+bx^2+cx+d then f'(x)=3ax^2+2bx+c then f''(x)=6ax+2b

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    f'(x)

  28. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    If it's the graph of f' then you simply need to see where the tangent lines have negative slope to find where f'' is less than 0.

  29. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i don get ya.(><)

  30. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Hey anyone wants to make money answering questions or do you need homework help? Try www.aceyourcollegeclasses.com

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