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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

lim of (x^3-13x+12)/(x^3-14x+15) as x approaches 3 without using L hopital's rule. :( hope you can help me guys.

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    dude none of them are going to help you

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    :( maybe you're right. </3

  3. nowhereman
    • 5 years ago
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    Don't be so pessimistic. Did you try actually dividing those polynomials as far as you can?

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    you have to divide it so that when you plug x=3 , the result is not 0/0

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i still get 0/0 guys

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    by using L hopital's rule i get 14/13. but the question must be solved w/o using it. :(

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    usually, there will be a common factor between the denominator and the numerator, but i can't factorize those polynomial

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    this problem sure is hard. xD

  9. nowhereman
    • 5 years ago
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    If a polynomial has a root "a", there is a factor (x-a) in it!

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i don't get your point bro.

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i got the common factor ! it's gonna be -> (x-3)(x^2 + 3x -4) / (x-3)(x^2+3x-5)

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    you can eliminate x-3, then plug x=3 you'll get -> (9+9-4)/(9+9-5) = 14/13

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    whoa! thanks din!!!

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    you're welcome btw, i got the common factor by using Horner's method

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I'm not familiar with it. can you please give some background :D

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i'll just google it. :)) thanks din for the info. ;)

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    :)

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    lol! it's just synthetic division :))

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    haha in my school we usually call it horner's method

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    The denominator and the numerator are both 0 when x = 3, what does that tell you?

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    it means that the function is in indeterminate form :)

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    obtaining 0/0 in a function doesn't that it has no limit. :)

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    what the answer in this question? please. I help me out 😉

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