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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

If an aircraft’s fuel has a relative density (specific gravity) of 0.78, what would 1,000 litres of fuel weigh in lbs? (assume 1 kg = 2.202 lbs). Just checking if my answer is correct. I got 1717.5 lbs

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Also "At time 1050 you see another aircraft on a bearing of 040° at a range of 10 miles. If at 1056 the bearing remains 040° but the range has reduced to 8 miles. At what time will the range reduce to 1 mile, assuming the bearing remains constant?" Got 1117 hrs. these are just questions I am unsure of

  2. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    what does the .78 represent? lbs, kgs, or what?

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I am guessing the density. I know that density is mass/volume but wasnt quite sure if the litres is a volumn of something

  4. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    literes is volume; if we know that .76 is a specific weight, but how is that weight measured... in kgs, lbs, etc....

  5. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    i would assume kgs...

  6. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    780 kgs = how many lbs? is the question I get from this...

  7. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    780(2.202) = weight in lbs... 1717.56 lbs of fuel for 1000 liters

  8. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    .78 grams/liter .78 kg/liter .78 is rather vague, but whats the definition for specific gravity?

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Oh so i basically got it it right but I slightly misunderstood the question. Well I actually didnt remember what specific gravity but I just assumed the 0.78 was the density cos of it said the relative density

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    what specific gravity is* Ok, the litres therefore becames the volume as a result cos its just a relative density. Ok thanks what about my second question

  11. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    theres a second question?

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yeah in the comments, could I make a new post?

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    should*

  14. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    new post it just for clarities sake :)

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