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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

can someone help me out on some calculus?

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    what's your question ^_^?

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    im doing second derivatives and graphing and i am totally lost

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    how come? which part are you lost in?

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    something that has to do with infelction points? :)

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    inflection*

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    this problem..summarize the pertinent information obtained by applying the graphing strategy and sketch the graph of y=f(x) f(x)=(x-2)(x^2-4x-8)

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i have no idea what to do. or where to start

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    does it have to do with graphing f'(x)?

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    it's in the lesson of second deriviatives and graphing

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so it has to do with inflection points :)because when you find the second derivative, you are finding, at the same time, the inflection points, where does the curve change, does it open up or down ^_^

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    it starts opening down them switches and opens up

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    excellent, so you have found the inflection points, can you compute the integral? Where does it start opening up + end + same with down? :)

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    okay so how do i find the exact point it changes. its -\[\infty\] starting then it turns and goes up

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    make a table putting the following: x| ( put the points you have found, Inflection points) then check what happens to f(x) when you substitute them in the function ^_^ is it (-)? (decreasing)? or (+)? (increasing)? ^_^ so if it's positive then it's opening upwards, and the vise versa ^_^ _____________________________________________ f(x)| _____________________________________________ f''(x)|

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    then from the x points you can see from where and where does it open upwards or downwards ^_^

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    can you give me an example like (0,16)

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    those are the x points?

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    no 0 is an x point

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    the y of that is 16 according to my calculator

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    by tracing the graph

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    wait, are you having trouble drawing the function?

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    no

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    lol, I'm sorry, I'm confused too ^^"

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    what's does your question really say?

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    for the answer in the back of the book it says: domain:all real numbers y int.: 16 x int. \[2-\sqrt{3}, 2, 2+2\sqrt{3}\] increasing on: (-\[\infty,0) and (4,\infty)\] decreasing on (0,4) local maximum at x+0, local minimum at x+4 concaved downward on (-\[\infty\], 2) concaved upward on (2, \[\infty\]) inflection pointat x+2

  26. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    im just trying to figure out how to get those things

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Alright, I got the question, they want you to find the critical points, increasing and decreasing intervals, inflection points, intervals of concavity, domain and range lol :)

  28. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes

  29. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    now i have no clue how to get that

  30. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Now for the domain and range, since you'r function is a polunomial then the domain + range = : \[(-\infty , \infty)\] 2) To find the critical numbers you've got to derive the function once then take 2 conditions for f'(x) to find the critical numbers a) f'(x) = 0 b) f'(x) = undefined For your question, for all x, x is defined :) , so you'll take condition (a), in this case, f'(x) = 0, then you can find the zeros of your function. Those zeros are your critical numbers. 3) To find the critical points, you have to draw a table, like the one I have showed you before, but instead of f''(x) it's going to be f'(x) and put the critical numbers in the table and the substitute them in the original function to check if you're going to get a (-) value = decreasing, or a (+) value = increasing. 5) For the inflection numbers, you have to derive once more and take the zeros of the function, same condition for f'(x) ^_^ so those zeros will be your inflection numbers 6) Put these numbers in the table, (the same one I have showed you above) or just put numbers - (any number) 0 and ( + any positive number) then substitute them in the original function to see whether you're getting a + value or negative. + = concaved up, - = concaved down 7) finally just put all the calculations you have found and translate it into a graph These are the steps ^_^ good luck

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