A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • 5 years ago

the derivative of y=e^3 ln x

  • This Question is Closed
  1. nowhereman
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    If you mean \[y=e^{3\ln x}\] use power rules to eliminate e and ln

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    no it's \[(e^3)(lnx)\]

  3. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    e^3 is jsut a constant so like any constant put it aside and derive ln(x) D(ln(x)) = 1/x now bring the constant back to it... e^3 --- x

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    oh, just as if the number 2 was in place of e^3? I would just leave it? oh, okay thanks

  5. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yep..... that e may look like a variable, but its just like "pi" in the sense thatits stands for an actual number :)

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    but how would you know if it's a constant? Because originally I used the product rule.

  7. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    There is this guy in mathmatics calle Euler. and he has a special number that pops up alot in natural stuff.. 2.71828182845905....... or something like that. So whenever you see an "e" being used in an equation, they are representing Eulers number.

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    okay, well thank you

  9. nowhereman
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Well, it pops-up a lot in mathematics too ^^. \[f(x) = e^x\] is the solution to the initial-value problem \[f'(x) = f(x)\] and also \[e^x = \lim_{n→∞}(1+\frac x n)^n = \sum_{n=0}^∞ \frac{x^n}{n!}\] expanding it to complex numbers you get \[e^{iπ} + 1 = 0\] So it really is a pretty amasing number.

  10. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    i use it on my taxes :)

  11. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    a better definition for "e" might be: lim(n->inf) (1 + 1/n)^n right?

  12. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    whcih of course is whats up there lol..... gotta quit glossing over stuff

  13. nowhereman
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Hehe, there so many ways to define it :-) Yet another would be to first define \[\ln x = \int_1^x \frac 1 x\] and then say e^x is the inverse function.

  14. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.