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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

a dice is thrown four times. what is the probability that it we will get the same number at last twice???

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  1. nowhereman
    • 5 years ago
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    Count the possibilities, to get those results, without counting anything more than once. e.g. there are 6 results where all three are the same. Then divide that number by the number of all possible outcomes (which is 6^3)

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I do not understand ur reasoning?

  3. nowhereman
    • 5 years ago
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    It is an Laplace experiment. So in order to get the probability you have to divide the number of positive outcomes by the number of all outcomes.

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    but when you throw the dice once, you have the probability 1/6 that it is 5 for example but here the dice is thrown 4 times?

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    do i have to multiply the probabilities?

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    or is it conditional probability p(A/b)

  7. nowhereman
    • 5 years ago
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    no, you should take every quadruple-combination as a single outcome.

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so in total there are 6^4 results I think?

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    now how do i find the rest?

  10. nowhereman
    • 5 years ago
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    yes, true

  11. nowhereman
    • 5 years ago
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    There are certainly several ways to count. I would count the disjount situations 1 Pair; 2 Pairs and 1 Tripel seperately. Use binomial to see which of the dices are equal and then multiply with the possible count of numbers.

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    is it 66/6^4

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes, thats what i did and i think there were 66?

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    toooooo complicated, nyway thank you

  15. nowhereman
    • 5 years ago
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    Well I get 6*6*5*4+4*6*5+6*6*5 = 1020 which makes about .787

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    not sure......

  17. nowhereman
    • 5 years ago
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    ah ok, I really made it too complicated you should look at the complementary event: "all 4 numbers are different"

  18. nowhereman
    • 5 years ago
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    there you can count easily 6*5*4*3 = 360

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ah, got it now, thats easier

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so the answer must b 6*5*4/6^4

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    now yes! thanx

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