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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

I have never used this site and am looking for geometry help for my daughter who is a 10th grader. I was hoping I could get help and then be able to help her. Is this what this group is about

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yeah. just post ur question and other people will look at it and help her work through the problem

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Not sure how to post it. There is a polygon with a circle inscribed in it. The polygon has across top 3 cm then 8 cm and on bottom 4 cm and 1 cm. I need to find the perimeter of the polygon. I would have added all 4 together and came up with 16 but that is incorrect. please help

  3. radar
    • 5 years ago
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    A polygon is a many sided 2 dimensional figure. How many sides make up this polygon?

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    4 sides to this polygon

  5. radar
    • 5 years ago
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    If that is the correct dimensions the perimeter would be 16, maybe they want the perimeter of the inscribed circle (circumference)

  6. radar
    • 5 years ago
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    Here is where a picture would be very helpful.

  7. radar
    • 5 years ago
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    Did you have the units on your answer. 16 cm

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I have the answer which is 32 cm but am unsure how they got it and need to be able to help explain it. I tried drawing it and attached it to this file

  9. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    is there a question that goes with the picture? cause if thats the picture and the numbers... then 16 would be my best assumption without anything further to go on

  10. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    otherwise, they want you to find some measurement for the circle..... is my next best guess

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I am attaching a copy of the exact question they gave her on her study guide.

  12. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    got it....

  13. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    the measurements are giving you the length of one side of the "section" that is being formed by the poly and the circle... since the circle touches at equal distances from each "corner" the length of each "side " is equal..... let me repost your pic....

  14. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    like this

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  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Got it. When I first looked at this I assumed it was the measurements x 2. so basically that is what they are doing.

  16. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    yep, and the reasoning behind it is similiar to triangles that have 2 equal sides. If you know one side, you know the other side is the same.....

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    THANK YOU so very much. She has a teacher that will only show them one time and expect them to get the answer. She is over stressed and needs major help. It is almost time for EOI test and she is clueless on geometry.

  18. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    youre welcome, and not to belittle teachers, but they just arent given enough time to actually teach these concepts appropriately

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I agree Teachers work extremly hard. Do you know of any programs that are online that can help her with her geometry to get a grip on these

  20. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    none that I can think of... im just old and learnt most of this stuff by teaching myself from old textbooks...

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Well thanks for all of your help.

  22. radar
    • 5 years ago
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    The attachment cleared it up for me also, Thanks vmann, good luck

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