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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

what is x? 2/3x+6=27

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    You can do this on your own. Just remember what I did on the previous equation. try it yourself, you will learn better :)

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    okay so you subtract 6 from both sides right

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    correct, then?

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    it will be 3*2/3x=21.3 i think

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    how did you get 21.3?

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i mean 21

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    no wait you multiply 3 in both sides

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    help me someone

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    right, you multiply by 3 on both sides, so what happens then?

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    then you multipy and x=63 right

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    for future reference when you mean 21 times 3 , write down 21*3, and not 21.3 :)

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    okay thank you

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    can u help me with -2(3x-6)=24

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    no, x is not 63, 2x = 63.

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    you multiplied by 3 on both sides, but the 2 is still there, remember?

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    oh yea okay

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    There are 200 lockers in your school, numbered 1 through 200 consecutively. The lockers are all closed to begin. Student #1 walks down the corridor and opens all the lockers that are numbered with a multiple of 1, thereby all the lockers are opened. Student #2 then walks down the corridor and changes the status (closed lockers are opened; open lockers are closed) of all the lockers that are numbered with a multiple of 2 (note that in the case of Student #2, this only involved closing lockers). Student #3 then walks down the corridor and changed the status of all the lockers that are numbered with a multiple of 3. By the end of this scenario, 200 students will have walked down the corridor, in numerical order, with each student changing the status of those lockers that are numbered with a number that is a multiple of the student’s number. At that point, which of the lockers are open? More importantly, why are these lockers open?

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    HELP^^^^

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    dont i have to divide then in both sides by 2

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes, you have to divide both sides by 2. so your answer is x = 63/2

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    There are 200 lockers in your school, numbered 1 through 200 consecutively. The lockers are all closed to begin. Student #1 walks down the corridor and opens all the lockers that are numbered with a multiple of 1, thereby all the lockers are opened. Student #2 then walks down the corridor and changes the status (closed lockers are opened; open lockers are closed) of all the lockers that are numbered with a multiple of 2 (note that in the case of Student #2, this only involved closing lockers). Student #3 then walks down the corridor and changed the status of all the lockers that are numbered with a multiple of 3. By the end of this scenario, 200 students will have walked down the corridor, in numerical order, with each student changing the status of those lockers that are numbered with a number that is a multiple of the student’s number. At that point, which of the lockers are open? More importantly, why are these lockers open?

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    There are 200 lockers in your school, numbered 1 through 200 consecutively. The lockers are all closed to begin. Student #1 walks down the corridor and opens all the lockers that are numbered with a multiple of 1, thereby all the lockers are opened. Student #2 then walks down the corridor and changes the status (closed lockers are opened; open lockers are closed) of all the lockers that are numbered with a multiple of 2 (note that in the case of Student #2, this only involved closing lockers). Student #3 then walks down the corridor and changed the status of all the lockers that are numbered with a multiple of 3. By the end of this scenario, 200 students will have walked down the corridor, in numerical order, with each student changing the status of those lockers that are numbered with a number that is a multiple of the student’s number. At that point, which of the lockers are open? More importantly, why are these lockers open?

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    There are 200 lockers in your school, numbered 1 through 200 consecutively. The lockers are all closed to begin. Student #1 walks down the corridor and opens all the lockers that are numbered with a multiple of 1, thereby all the lockers are opened. Student #2 then walks down the corridor and changes the status (closed lockers are opened; open lockers are closed) of all the lockers that are numbered with a multiple of 2 (note that in the case of Student #2, this only involved closing lockers). Student #3 then walks down the corridor and changed the status of all the lockers that are numbered with a multiple of 3. By the end of this scenario, 200 students will have walked down the corridor, in numerical order, with each student changing the status of those lockers that are numbered with a number that is a multiple of the student’s number. At that point, which of the lockers are open? More importantly, why are these lockers open?

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so its 31.5

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    There are 200 lockers in your school, numbered 1 through 200 consecutively. The lockers are all closed to begin. Student #1 walks down the corridor and opens all the lockers that are numbered with a multiple of 1, thereby all the lockers are opened. Student #2 then walks down the corridor and changes the status (closed lockers are opened; open lockers are closed) of all the lockers that are numbered with a multiple of 2 (note that in the case of Student #2, this only involved closing lockers). Student #3 then walks down the corridor and changed the status of all the lockers that are numbered with a multiple of 3. By the end of this scenario, 200 students will have walked down the corridor, in numerical order, with each student changing the status of those lockers that are numbered with a number that is a multiple of the student’s number. At that point, which of the lockers are open? More importantly, why are these lockers open?

  26. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    kerianne, please post your question in another thread. I will attend to it there. It will get confusing here.

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    woaah, just takei it easy man ....

  28. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    that is right, x =31.5

  29. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    There are 200 lockers in your school, numbered 1 through 200 consecutively. The lockers are all closed to begin. Student #1 walks down the corridor and opens all the lockers that are numbered with a multiple of 1, thereby all the lockers are opened. Student #2 then walks down the corridor and changes the status (closed lockers are opened; open lockers are closed) of all the lockers that are numbered with a multiple of 2 (note that in the case of Student #2, this only involved closing lockers). Student #3 then walks down the corridor and changed the status of all the lockers that are numbered with a multiple of 3. By the end of this scenario, 200 students will have walked down the corridor, in numerical order, with each student changing the status of those lockers that are numbered with a number that is a multiple of the student’s number. At that point, which of the lockers are open? More importantly, why are these lockers open?

  30. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    There are 200 lockers in your school, numbered 1 through 200 consecutively. The lockers are all closed to begin. Student #1 walks down the corridor and opens all the lockers that are numbered with a multiple of 1, thereby all the lockers are opened. Student #2 then walks down the corridor and changes the status (closed lockers are opened; open lockers are closed) of all the lockers that are numbered with a multiple of 2 (note that in the case of Student #2, this only involved closing lockers). Student #3 then walks down the corridor and changed the status of all the lockers that are numbered with a multiple of 3. By the end of this scenario, 200 students will have walked down the corridor, in numerical order, with each student changing the status of those lockers that are numbered with a number that is a multiple of the student’s number. At that point, which of the lockers are open? More importantly, why are these lockers open?

  31. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    There are 200 lockers in your school, numbered 1 through 200 consecutively. The lockers are all closed to begin. Student #1 walks down the corridor and opens all the lockers that are numbered with a multiple of 1, thereby all the lockers are opened. Student #2 then walks down the corridor and changes the status (closed lockers are opened; open lockers are closed) of all the lockers that are numbered with a multiple of 2 (note that in the case of Student #2, this only involved closing lockers). Student #3 then walks down the corridor and changed the status of all the lockers that are numbered with a multiple of 3. By the end of this scenario, 200 students will have walked down the corridor, in numerical order, with each student changing the status of those lockers that are numbered with a number that is a multiple of the student’s number. At that point, which of the lockers are open? More importantly, why are these lockers open?

  32. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    okay thank you very much so i really need help with this one because im very confused with this one can u please help

  33. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    There are 200 lockers in your school, numbered 1 through 200 consecutively. The lockers are all closed to begin. Student #1 walks down the corridor and opens all the lockers that are numbered with a multiple of 1, thereby all the lockers are opened. Student #2 then walks down the corridor and changes the status (closed lockers are opened; open lockers are closed) of all the lockers that are numbered with a multiple of 2 (note that in the case of Student #2, this only involved closing lockers). Student #3 then walks down the corridor and changed the status of all the lockers that are numbered with a multiple of 3. By the end of this scenario, 200 students will have walked down the corridor, in numerical order, with each student changing the status of those lockers that are numbered with a number that is a multiple of the student’s number. At that point, which of the lockers are open? More importantly, why are these lockers open?

  34. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    There are 200 lockers in your school, numbered 1 through 200 consecutively. The lockers are all closed to begin. Student #1 walks down the corridor and opens all the lockers that are numbered with a multiple of 1, thereby all the lockers are opened. Student #2 then walks down the corridor and changes the status (closed lockers are opened; open lockers are closed) of all the lockers that are numbered with a multiple of 2 (note that in the case of Student #2, this only involved closing lockers). Student #3 then walks down the corridor and changed the status of all the lockers that are numbered with a multiple of 3. By the end of this scenario, 200 students will have walked down the corridor, in numerical order, with each student changing the status of those lockers that are numbered with a number that is a multiple of the student’s number. At that point, which of the lockers are open? More importantly, why are these lockers open?

  35. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    HEEEEEEEEEEEEEELLLLLLPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  36. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    um im not tryin to be rude bt can u write it somewhere else cuz i ned help tooo

  37. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    kerianne, all the prime numbered locks are open.

  38. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    jl;vjl;l'gl; dg' tyf

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