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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

I am really stuck on this question, Can someone please help me????

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    what question is that?

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I am trying to add a fraction that has a different denominator, but am trying to figure out how do you know when to change the numerator???

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    give an example.

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    1/4 + 3/10 + 2/5, now is no the LCD is 20, now my question is how do I change to numerator???

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Or how do I know when to change it???

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    alright, do you notice something about the fractions 1/2 and 5/10?

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes that they are equivalent!!!!

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    okay good. so 5/10 is basically 1/2 multiplied by 5 on both numerator and denominator correct?

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Ok so when adding fractions together I basically find the multiple of the denominator and make it the numerator. Example, 1/4 + 2/5 + 3/10 change to 5/20 + 10/20 + 6/20?

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    are you sure 2/5 is the same as 10/20?

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    My mistake 2/5 will be 8/20... right?

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    right. now, all your fractions have a common denominator. so you can add up all the numerators.

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I really am not getting this numerator and denominator part. Because I know am mutiplying right but my answer isn't corresponding with the answer in my book!!!!

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    the answer should be 19/20

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Its right, but am trying to make sure I understand how to change the numerator when you find the LCD to the problem!!!!! Are their any rules to changing the numerator to a problem???

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Suppose you had a pizza. Suppose the delivery guy had cut it into 6 equal parts. you paid the pizza guy 10 dollars for your pizza. Now lets say you wanted to share the pizza with me since you can't finish it all on your own. Suppose I paid you 3 dollars. How much pizza should I get?

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Just give me one second am working it out!!!!

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    take your time.

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Am not sure how to work this problem... I really thank you for spending you time trying to help me with this problem am having!!!!

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    no problem. Let me explain. your pizza costs 10 dollars. I said I will pay you 3 dollars for my share of the pizza. now suppose instead of cutting the pizza in 6 pieces, the delivery guy had cut it into ten pieces. Then I would get 3 pieces, because there are totally 10 pieces, so each piece is worth 1 dollar. Are you with me so far?

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Yes

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Okay, good. But the problem is that the pizza guy cut it into 6 pieces. So how do I get my fair share and how do you get your fair share?

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so, I should get three-tenths of the pizza because I paid 3 dollars for it. right?

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Okay, so what I am going to do is cut up each of the 6 pieces into 5 smaller pieces, so that we have 30 total pieces. then three-tenths of 30 pieces is 9. So, I would get 9 of the smaller pieces.

  26. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Okay do you mind giving me a call, Because I am so lost!!!!

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    If you dont mind my number is 773 414 7155 thanks

  28. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    What did you not understand in this example?

  29. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Try considering when you multiply a denominator like the ones you have, say 4/5 to 8/10. The number cannot be changed so technically you are multiplying the fraction by 1. (4/5) * (2/2) = 8/10. In your case (1/4)*(5/5) = 5/20, (2/5)*(4/4)= 8/20, then you have the last one, and any other fraction you need to get a common denominator for. Remember you cannot just up and change any number's value, but you can change the way it looks. Multiply by 1. (sorry to but in by the way. I just wanted to see what the question you had actually was.)

  30. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    http://www.dabbleboard.com/draw?b=Guest645290&i=0&c=3f49f5a056475207455ee8e98a3fdabbea0850cb khiyah join me there I will be able to explain it better

  31. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ok

  32. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so 2/5 means that out of 5 pieces, you have 2 pieces, or that out of 20 pieces, you have 8 pieces, since 2/5=8/20 or that out of 40 pieces, you have 16 pieces. since 2/5 = 16/40

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