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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

what is the the l.c.m of 60 and 15

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    60

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    It's 3

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    isn't that the least common denominator?

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    It's the least common multiple. To find the LCM, you write out all the factors of each number and pick the factor they have in common that is lowest.

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I thought the lcm had to actually be a multiple of both of the numbers

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    It does. 3 is a multiple of 60 *and* 15, since 3x20 = 60 3x5=15

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    How i understand it is that the lcm would be the smallest number that both numbers are equal to when multiplied by an integer, such as 15x=0 ,15x1=1, 15x2=30, 15x3=45, 15x4=60 60x0=0, 60x1=60 so they both share 60?

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    In general: To find the lowest common multiple (LCM) of two or more numbers, list the multiples of the larger number and stop when you find a multiple of the other number. This is the LCM.

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Ok thanks I think I get you now.

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Here, check this link out: http://www.mathsteacher.com.au/year7/ch03_prime/03_lcm/lcm.htm It goes through some examples. You'll see what I mean.

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    According to the link you gave me, the lcm of 6 and 9 is 18...why not 3 like it is for 15 and 60?

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Yeah, I'm absolutely sorry - I've been thinking of the wrong thing the whole time. This is what happens when I multitask - I begin to stuff simple things. The LCM of 60 and 15 is 60. You were right.

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    My apologies.

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Yeah I can see that you are answering all of the harder questions that are posted, I just got confused when you said it was three though, but its alright.

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Stupid definitions ><

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