anonymous
  • anonymous
how would you solve this problem in simplest form: x with power of 3 divided by 2y power of 2 times 6y power of 4 divided by xy?
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
Hey! We 've verified this expert answer for you, click below to unlock the details :)
SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
anonymous
  • anonymous
\[x ^{3}\div(2y)^{2} * (6y)^{4}\div xy\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
But written as two fractions... is that what you mean?
anonymous
  • anonymous
or \[2y ^{2}\]

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.

More answers

anonymous
  • anonymous
and \[6y ^{4}\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
in the 2y problem the y is to the power of 2 and in 6y the y is to the power of 4
anonymous
  • anonymous
OK.. So here is a long way of thinking about this first.
anonymous
  • anonymous
x^3 = x * x * x 2y^2 = 2 * y * y 6y^4 = 2 * 3 * y * y * y * y xy = x * y Do you agree with this?
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes
anonymous
  • anonymous
So we have x * x * x 2 * 3 * y * y * y * y -------- * ---------------- 2 * y * y x * y OK?
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok
anonymous
  • anonymous
When everything is being multiplied... You can cancel out anything on the top with anything on the bottom...
anonymous
  • anonymous
So I would put a slash thru the 2 on the top and then put a slash thru the 2 on the bottom. What else do you see?
amistre64
  • amistre64
cancel out any "like" terms top to bottom ;)
anonymous
  • anonymous
oops you are so right amistre64.. I was thinking it but forgot to type it.
anonymous
  • anonymous
are you talking about just the 2's I'm confused.
anonymous
  • anonymous
No... what else is alike... I see an x on the bottom and an x on top... put slashes thru those. I see three y's on the bottom that can cancel with three y's on top. Do you see that?
anonymous
  • anonymous
that should leave you with 3x^2y x^2 is x to the 2nd power.
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes I just did that now do I cross multiply then divide to get the answer?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Well. you don't cross multiply... You basically cancel like terms top and bottom and then whatever is left over on top stays on top and whatever is left over on the bottom stays on the bottom (what I mean by left over is that it doesn't get cancelled out) There is a simpler way... but I don't know if you are ready for it yet. Do you have another problem like this?
anonymous
  • anonymous
I have nine more problems to do on a worksheet.
anonymous
  • anonymous
OK
anonymous
  • anonymous
I am going to try to do them by myself since I got you to help me I may have to ask you again later if that is okay?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Ooops.. Any algebraic Equation, which requires a solution should (must) have two sides, I mean exactly one "equals to (=)". Sorry. But this question is not complete.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yes... I will stay on this post.
amistre64
  • amistre64
simplifying does not require an (=) sign. the results of simplifying do equal, but to simplify or reduce does not necessitate the need for an (=) sign :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
Okay. then it is 324*x^2*y. As I simplified (starting from the very first responce by blexting: [{x^3}/{4y^2}] * [{1296y^4}/xy] 324{x^2}y
amistre64
  • amistre64
that would be a good result :) now all we need to know is if we have the right "problem" ;)
anonymous
  • anonymous
wpgaurav.. if you notice, Angelia said that the (2y)^4 was actually 2y^4 and (6y)^4 was actually 6y^4.... I wrote what I thought she was saying, but it wasn't.

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.