anonymous
  • anonymous
I need help with probability and the counting principle
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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katieb
  • katieb
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amistre64
  • amistre64
how sophisticated do you need to go?
amistre64
  • amistre64
I got a rudimentary understanding of probability
anonymous
  • anonymous
6th grade level it doesn't make sense to me

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amistre64
  • amistre64
give us a problem and lets see if we can work thru it :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok thanks
anonymous
  • anonymous
how many different words can be made using the words quick, slow, and sad and the suffixes -ness, -er, and -ly.
anonymous
  • anonymous
is the answer 9
amistre64
  • amistre64
so we have 4 words, and 3 endings. right? each word can be made 3 times; sadness, sadder, sadly... you do that 4 times and you get 12 words. theres a "tree" you can form" but Id have to go to paint to do it...
anonymous
  • anonymous
three words and three endings
amistre64
  • amistre64
yeah...I saw 4 words...that was my mistake :)
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amistre64
  • amistre64
the concept is the same tho....so yeas, 9 :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
this is difficult to explain without drawing pictures
anonymous
  • anonymous
I need to know the probability of two colored spinners and stuff like that
amistre64
  • amistre64
write it out, lets see if I can understand it :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
Great! Thanks for being so patient
anonymous
  • anonymous
Here goes...
anonymous
  • anonymous
a coin is tossed, and a letter is chosen from a bag . The letters in the bag are X, P, Z, K, M, A, E, Y 11. How many outcomes are possible? 12. Find P(heads, E). 13. What is the probability of tails and P, Z, or M?
anonymous
  • anonymous
I don't understand what the coin has to do with it
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm never gonna get this
amistre64
  • amistre64
the coin is jsut an additional "variable" in it.... you start with the coin toss, which is 50% chance of getting heads or tails right?
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes
amistre64
  • amistre64
ther are 2 outcomes from the coin toss, and 8 outcomes from the letters in the bag right? 16 outcomes total correct?
anonymous
  • anonymous
I think I was making it harder thatn it actually was
anonymous
  • anonymous
thank you
amistre64
  • amistre64
youre welcome, sometines all it takes is a fresh set of eyes :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
but wait
anonymous
  • anonymous
Can I just run this by you to make sure I understand everything
amistre64
  • amistre64
P(heads,E) I would assume means (100/2,100/16) sure run it by me..
amistre64
  • amistre64
50% and 100/8 actually... 12.5% P(50%,12.5%)
anonymous
  • anonymous
yikes I think I'm lost again
anonymous
  • anonymous
how did you get 100 over 8
amistre64
  • amistre64
I dont quite understand the notation P(heads,E) but to me it would mean that there is a 1 in 2 chance of getting heads: 100/2 = 50% and a 1 in 8 chance of getting an "E"; 100/8 = 12.5%
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh ok
amistre64
  • amistre64
100 is just the "percent" number.... I use it to adjust for the "chances" into an actual percentage
anonymous
  • anonymous
what are independent vs. dependent events
anonymous
  • anonymous
Believe it or not I do well in math but this probability stuff is confusing to me
amistre64
  • amistre64
when 2 things happen without a cause, they are independant of each other. The snow falling in alaska and my shoe coming untied in NewYork are not related, they are independant of each other. the opposite of that is events that occur because of the other. like: The light was off, I stubbed my toe.
anonymous
  • anonymous
cool analogy but how do I apply it to this unit on probability

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