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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

How do we find the greatest common factor of a polynomial? Demonstrate the process with an example, showing your work. When finding the greatest common factor of a polynomial, can it ever be larger than the smallest coefficient? Can it ever be smaller than the smallest coefficient?

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I am so stuck on this...so need help..if anyone can...sorry.

  2. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    by intuition the smallest coeeficient is the bounds to the GCF. How can you possibly have a number larger than the number you are factoring? the largest facotr of any number is itself and 1, then they get smaller from there. makes sense?

  3. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    20 for example: 1,2,4,5 10, 20 these are the factors of 20.... they are limited to 1 thru 20

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Kind of....I guess...I am not having an easy time in this class and I am not sure why....but I never had to take this kind of stuff, and I get so confused

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    huh, now that makes more sense to me...

  6. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    if we have 2 number: 16 and 20 the biggest "common" number between them cannot be bigger than 16 right? because what number greater than 16 is a factor of 16? none.

  7. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    20 factors to: 1,2,4,5,10,20 16 factors to: 1,2,4,8,16 what is the largest number they have in common?

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ok...I really appreciate you helping me....this has gotten me all frustrated. I think I will be glad when this class is over. I will guess 4?

  9. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    4 is absolutely correct. it is the "greatest" "common" "factor"...thunder clap.......what!?! no thunder?....oh well, moving on :)

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    lol....too funny...thanks for the laugh!

  11. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    :) keep practicing, youll get it ;)

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I completely understand what you are saying here, however how am I supposed to make an example for them?

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I sure hope so...this is kicking my butt!

  14. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    id show them 16 and 20 and tell them that the number common between them is "smaller" than the smallest cooefficient, but can in no way be larger then the smallest coefficient... make a polynomial like this perhaps: 20x +16

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ok...thanks so much:)

  16. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    youre welcome :)

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