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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

HOW TO DERIVE HELP ME PLEASE

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    have you learned limits, limit based formula, derivative rules ?

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i have no idea i just want to learn something ..please anyone can?

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    or anyone can give some easy example with step by step.

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    .... uhm... thats not going to be very easy, check out pauls online notes

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    differentiation takes quite a bit of prior knowledge

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    its was my prof fault he teach very fast...i have some background all i need some example with steps in deriving tnx

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ah ok, so you understand what a derivative is by defenition, just not how to find it?

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yup

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ok so the limit based formula is: \[(f(x+\Delta x)-f(x)) \div \Delta x\]

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    this is just a rewritten formula for slope or dy/dx (y1-y2)/(x1-x2)

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    because x1-x2 is delta x or written as \[\Delta x\]

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ok continue please

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    the symbol \[\Delta x\] is used. the top is just y2-y1. y2 is the function of your second x aka f(x2) so that can be written as the function of your first x plus the distance between your first and second x, which just gives you the function of your second x.

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    the symbol \[\Delta x\] is used. the top is just y2-y1. y2 is the function of your second x aka f(x2) so that can be written as the function of your first x plus the distance between your first and second x, which just gives you the function of your second x.

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    aka f(x+deltax)

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    but the formula for slope is y2 MINUS y1 so you we say f(x+deltax) minus f(x) which is just y2 minus y1 aka f(x+ deltax)-f(x)

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    hence we get that (y2-y1)/(x2-x1) = dy/dx = (f(x2)-f(x1)/(x2-x1) = (f(x+dx)-f(x))/dx

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    that is the slope formula rewritten in terms of x. when you plug in two points you will get your slope between them, the point of a derivative is the INSTANT rate of change also known as the slope at an INSTANT in time, x usually represents time so its the slope of the line when x is the same. BUT if x is the saem you end up with 0/0. hence the limit comes in, because x cannot be EXACTLY the same, we make it so that its incredible close in value, aka make it so that x2-x1 is almost 0, which is the same as making delta x almost 0 aka taking the limit as delta x goes to 0

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    make sense?

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    a little tnanks arman i guess need to read more here,, is this conversation is automatically saves to my profile?? im new here im from philippine and i cant speak english well tnx again

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ill post a picture of finding the derivative of x^3

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    wtf is that, stupid school computers

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    rofl i dont even know that kid

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