A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • 5 years ago

using standard equation to give the radius and center of the circle; (x-4)^2+(y-3)^2=16 a little HELP!! plz!!

  • This Question is Closed
  1. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    that 16 tells us the radius is sqrt(16) = 4 the center of the circle is shown by whatever those numbers are that are messing around with your x and y parts. center is at(4,3)

  2. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    (x-4) says that it was originally at another location but we moved it to get a normal; reading.... we moved it by -4 to get it back to 0, so it was originally at 0+4 = 4

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Well you know the standard formula is (x-h)^2 + (y-k)^2 = r^2. In this case, r^2=16 so r=4. H and K are the x- and y- coordinates for the circle respectively, so you know from your equation that the x-coordinates of the center is 4 and the y-coordinate of the center is 3. So your center would be located at (4,3)

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    can you please show me the steps PLEASE!!

  5. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    say you wanna look at something that is on a shelf, what do you do? you pick it up, move it over to where you can get a good lok at it, and when your done you put it back right?

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yes

  7. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    well, when we look at circles, or any equation, we want to observe them from (x=0,y=0) so if they are over someplace else we gotta move them...

  8. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    lets say this circle is centered at (4,0) how far do we move it to get it to (0,0) so that we can look at it?

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    -4

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    no -3

  11. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    thats correct, so we make a note to ourselves going, we moved x -4, so that when we want to put it back....we can remember where we got it from. -4 was correct

  12. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    you see the (x-4) part in your problem?

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so is that how it came??

  14. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    thats exactly how it came; ... :)

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so if the equation is (x-5)^2+(y-1)^2=25 then r=5 and centre= (5,1)???

  16. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    you got it, that is absolutely correct..... good job :)

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so there is no complicated algebra we gotta do??

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so what if the equation is (x-(1/2))^2+(y+(3/4)^2=(1/4)

  19. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    then just pull out the fraction stuff as your answer, x = 1/2 y = -3/4 radius = sqrt(1/4) = 1/2

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok so now i have a graph and i have to give the coordinates of the centre, the radius, and the equation of the circle the graph is like this:: . . . 5 . . . . . . . 4 . . . . . . . 3 . . . . . . . 2 . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . 0 . . . . . . -1 . . . . . . -2 . . . .

  21. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.