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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

how to sketch 1+ [2/(x+1)]

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    u mean a graph?

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    r u der?

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes a graph

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    alright, lets take the given function as y so, y=1+[2/(x+1)]

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    now, substitute x=0, u'll get y value, so this gives u one point on the graph like (x,y) i think u know how to plot point on a graph , right?

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thank you very much lokisan ^.^

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    you still need to do what thinker was doing...i.e. drawing it yourself

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    and yeah...try plugging more point..x=-1,1, -2,2,....so on..to get a good graph :)

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    sry *points

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    and the graph that u get finally is a symmetric one, i.e. symmetric about the 1st & 3rd quadrants

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    This one shows both asymptotes.

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  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thank you very much thinker! =]

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    You should notice some qualitative aspects of the function to make your drawing easier. For example, as x approaches -1, the function approach plus or minus infinity, depending on which direction -1 is being approached. As x goes to plus or minus infinity, the function goes to 1.

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ur welcome @virtus :)

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i'm a bit confused on the asymptotes bit i know we can determine one asymptote by looking at the denominator of the fraction but how did you get the other, y =1

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Once you get a bit more advanced, you'll notice that your function is just a composition of functions and that what you've got is just a hyperbolic function (1/x) that has been translated by a horizontal shift (i.e. x goes to x+constant)) with the result of that multiplied by 2 (thereby pushing the corner of the hyperbola further out) and then the entire thing shifted up 1 unit.

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    \[y=1+\frac{2}{x+1}\]What happens as x gets larger without bound?

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Very large positive x will make 2/(x+1) a very small positive number. Very large negative x will make 2/(x+1) a very small negative number. You'll be adding/subtracting very small amounts for large x. As x gets large, this effect is more pronounced.

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    So basically, the function approaches the value 1 and x approached plus or minus infinity.

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    You can see that in the plot.

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Btw, the software I used to make that plot is free: http://www.geogebra.org/cms/

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    got it @virtus?

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    oh well, we'll assume virtus has got it... :p

  26. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    hahahhas sorry for late reply THANK YOU SO SO MUCH!

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    np

  28. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ur wc

  29. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Use wolframalpha http://www.wolframalpha.com just write your formula and hit Enter

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