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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

When writing poetry what do you believe gets the point and opinion across more cleary, Rhyming line by line syllable by syllable. Or every other line or does it even matter? I am a poet. and i was wondering what most other people do. I most usually do line by line syllable by syllable

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i really enjoy every other line because it does not get too formulaic that way

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    really? ok lol yes I just do not kno how to get the point across clearly and rhythmically that way. but I guess im gonna look into it a lot more bc i keep hearing about more professionals rhyming every other line.

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    This is not a simple question. The type of rhyming scheme depends on the purpose of the poem—the point, as you say. If your poem is a children's poem, you want to have a very specific meter and rhyme that makes it easy to remember by the sing-song style. On the other hand, if you are trying to write a long descriptive poem, you might opt for blank verse, usually in iambic pentameter—see, for instance, Thanatopsis by William Cullen Bryant. Sometimes, you can even mix and match to convey a feeling of confusion. In "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock", T.S. Eliot has a few rhyming lines (usually in couplets, but sometimes separated by other lines) in a poem that is mostly unrhymed. That doesn't prevent it from being one of the most amazing poems written in English. Of course, you have completely unrhymed poetry as well, like The Wild Iris, by Louise Gluck. Another wonderful piece of work, and not a single rhyme in it—she creates the atmosphere via skillful and creative use of meter. Poetry is an art for good reason: we can point to good poems, but we can't tell you ahead of time what will make your poem good. Try to write something that both you and your readers are happy with; it'll take time to get it right, but it's worth it.

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes. i dont write childrens poems. i right adult poetry, however i dont know why but i just cannot seem to get the point across as strongy as i can when rhyming every other line i am going to post a poem i have written and would u mind teling me what i can work on?

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes that works. my grandmother was a very famous poet so i do know what i am talking about

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thats good! If you scroll down a ways u can find them. Or if u want i can repost them!!

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