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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

ok so i think i just have one more question: (30b^3+14b^2+37b+42)/(5b+4) I have a major problem understanding these equations.

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I feel for you. I hate these. Do you know polynomial long division? Did you learn it yet? I think that would be the best way to tackle it but if you haven't learned it yet then maybe they are expecting you to do it a different way. If you learned it but don't understand it, I can find a place that explains it.

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    no the main thing we have been learning is factoring

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    help polpak

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Are you certain you've written the problem correctly? This doesn't seem to simplify well.

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    That's very mean of them. Well you can guess that (5b+4) will be one of the factors because you have to divide it somehow. So now you have to figure out what w, x, y, z, are in (5b + 4)(wx + x)(yb + z) so that it equals the numberator. However 42 isn't divisible by 4 so I am thinking too that you might have typed it wrong or that they made a mistake when they gave you that problem.

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes i double checked. the instructions just say "divide"

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I don't think you can even do that problem easily without polynomial long division. Because if you look at my post I just made, 4*x*z must equal 42. The problem is, 42 isn't divisible by 4 so x or z must be a fraction. That's gross. I'll try to solve it and tell you if I succeed.

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thank you

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    There must have been a mistake somewhere. I plugged it into wolfram alpha and I got this: http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=factor+%2830b^3%2B14b^2%2B37b%2B42%29 (b+0.878016) (b-(0.205675+1.24587 i)) (b-(0.205675-1.24587 i)) I don't think it is possible. You can't even factor the numerator without getting complex roots.

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thank you anyways! i really do appreciate all the help!

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    No problem. If it turns out that you can do it, my apologies.

  12. dumbcow
    • 5 years ago
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    If you just use long division it doesn't come out that bad. -> 6b^2 - 2b + 9 + 6/5b+4

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