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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

how do i find the measure of triangles? Is there a website I can go to for help?

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    wat do u mean? using angles and trigonometry? give n example ill be able to help you :)

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I need to find m<1 through m<6

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  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    very simple problem :)...so elts look at angle 2 first...wat do u notice?

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    u should notice that one angle is defined as 40 degrees, and the second is a right angle (therefore 90 degrees), and we know that in a triangle, all angles sum up to be 180 degrees right?...therefore for angle two, just subtract 40, and 90 from 180, leaving u with 50

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so 2= 50 degrees.

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I look at your example. Please give me a sec

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    sure!

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Ok, I understand that one.

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so its basically the samething with every triangle that has 2 angles already defined right?

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so now try and find angle 6

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Would 6 be m<6=50 degrees

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    YES!

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    there you go u understand it!

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Would m<1 be 35 degrees

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    now...lets look at 4....4 is located on a straight line, meaning that that angle plus the one given beside it (60) is equal to 180 right? so simply do 180-60

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes m1 is 35!

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    umm. so m<4=60 degrees?

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    no m4 is equal to 180-60 degrees. do u understand why its 180-60?

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    (120 degrees)

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Ok, Sorry I miss read it. so all side on a straight would be 60+60+60 which equals 180 so 180-60=120.

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes in this case its 120, but say that the angle was 30 instead of 60, then it woudl just be 180-30 which would give u 150...understand that?

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    perfect!...so u good for this question, or do u have any other questions?

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I understand now. Thanks for your help

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    hi

  26. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    these kind of questions are questions u have to take step by step you know? u cant jut go at it, without finding basic angles...anyway good luck with ur studies hope i helped u understand,

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    can anyone tell me if geometric series alternate??

  28. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    anyone please

  29. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    http://www.ugrad.math.ubc.ca/coursedoc/math101/notes/series/convergence.html taht will help u

  30. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    usually they dont, but there are exceptions

  31. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    the website explain convergent

  32. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so js does not matter??

  33. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    wat do you mean

  34. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i am asking if you could have alternate geometric series

  35. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    kk wat do u mean by alternate? cuz simply wat geometric series are, are values who keep getting multiplied...

  36. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ohhh

  37. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i am saying about the sign.. negative .. positive.. does not really matter

  38. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geometric_progression

  39. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes they can be negative

  40. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    it rlly doesnt matter

  41. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thx

  42. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i didn't know that

  43. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    well glad i could help

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