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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

Determine an equation of the line through the given point is parallel to the given line: (-1,2): 3y+2x=6

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    What's the slope of the given line?

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    not sure

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Can you quickly solve for y?

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    3y=6+2x

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    If you put the equation in the form y=mx + b m will be your slope.

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    err y=mx+b m is the slope.

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    That's not quite right. It should be 3y=-2x + 6

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Now divide by 3.

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    So y=-2x+2

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    So y=-2x+2

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    No. \[y=\frac{-2}{3}x + 2\]

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Go a little slower, you 're making a number of clerical mistakes.

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Okay, I understand. Now, isn't there yet another formula to put in the points?

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Once you have the slope of the given line you know the slope of your parallel line (parallel lines have the same slope). You can make your new line using the point slope formula: \[y-y_0 = m(x-x_0)\] Where m is the slope of your line, and \(x_0,y_0\) are the x and y values of a point on the line.

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    So m=the -2/3+2

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Sorry, i'm horrible at this

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    y-2=m(x-(-1))

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Then y-2=m(x+1)

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    m = -2/3 Not the +2.

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    -2/3 is the slope. y = mx + b The m is the slope.

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    So is this right then.....y=-2/3s11

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    y-2=-2/3(x+1) is correct. Then simplify. into y = something.

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Wow, i don't know how else to simplify this

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    \[y-2 = \frac{-2}{3}(x+1)\] Add 2 to both sides. \[y = \frac{-2}{3}(x+1) + 2 \] Multiply through the -2/3. \[y = \frac{-2}{3}x -\frac{2}{3} + 2 \] Combine the non-variable terms.

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    So y=2?

  26. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Okay, i'm seriously horrible at this.

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Is there a Algebra for Dummies book out there? I'm sure there is, and it's going to be with my other books.

  28. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    There's a number of good videos you can watch.

  29. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    http://www.khanacademy.org/video/simple-equations?playlist=Algebra

  30. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Start there and work on some of the more complicated equations too

  31. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Well, I need it seriously to finish this class. . Can you help me finish this one please.....

  32. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I will certainly do that.

  33. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Just bookmarked it.

  34. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    You should have y = (-2/3)x + 4/3

  35. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    All the other questions are coming up similar to 3x+y-6=0 They all have 0's at the ends..

  36. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    That doesn't matter. You can always move things back and forth across the equal sign by adding or subtracting things.

  37. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    So I could do -2/3x+y+2=0

  38. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    You can, but there's no need.

  39. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thank you very much

  40. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Also that would be wrong.

  41. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Because you have to add (2/3)x -4/3 to both sides (or subtract y from both sides) to get 0.

  42. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Okay, i understand that. Thanks.

  43. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    You sure are good at this.

  44. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    You need to review working with equations a bit, and take things slowly, but you'll get there. Math is a practiced skill, not an innate talent.

  45. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I know, thanks again.

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