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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

what is the greatest common factor between 5 and -3

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    The Greatest Common Factor (GCF) of some numbers, is the largest number that divides evenly into all of the numbers. Like, the GCF of 10,15, and 25 is 5. so for 5 and -3 your The Greatest Common Factor (GCF) of the numbers 5,-3 is 1 because 1 is the greatest number that divides evenly into all of them.

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    http://www.webmath.com/intgcf.html is a very helpful website for finding GCF

  3. radar
    • 5 years ago
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    I have just fanned you mmbuckaroos for an excellent answer and the helpful link

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Thank you! I'm already a fan of you!

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thank you so much!!

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    No problem anytime bud!

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    hey, do you know how to factor polynomials?

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Uhm do you have an example?

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes one of them states.. (2a+ab)+(2c+bc)

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    First Question: Does your polynomial have a GCF? Always factor out the GCF first (when there is one)!

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes but i don't know it

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    it's 1

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ok one sec let me look at this again give me just a sec

  14. radar
    • 5 years ago
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    They have already grouped it so there is a common factor within each grouping

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    correct?!

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    (2a+ab)+(2c+bc) 2a+ab+(2c+bc) (b+2)(c+a)

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    the two bottom answers must match ^^

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    WHat do you mean the two bottom answers must match? (b+2)(c+a) would be the final answer I think

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    like the answer would be (the final would be ) (1r+4)(2b-8)

  20. radar
    • 5 years ago
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    Here is the problem as you stated: (2a+ab)+(2c+bc) Look closely at the first part in paren. The 2a+ab.........What do you see that is common to both terms?

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    it has an a

  22. radar
    • 5 years ago
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    Yes, remove the a and express it like this a(2+b). Do you agree that is the same thing?

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ohhh ok i see it

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thank u

  25. radar
    • 5 years ago
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    Good now the second part, what do you see that is common to both terms in the second set of paren namely the (2c+bc)?

  26. radar
    • 5 years ago
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    Big_rod when you return...... that can be factored also, extracting the c getting c(2+b) now write the equation like this using the revised a(2+b)+c(2+b) Now hat do you see that is common to both terms? The (2+b) is common, extract that and get the final answer , the same one that mmbuckroos got (2+b)(a+c)

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Thanks Radar you explained that much better than I did! Good review for me as well thanks!

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