A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • 5 years ago

Evaluate:

  • This Question is Closed
  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    what to ??

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I am looking for the symbol hold on a minute

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    u can even type the name of symbol

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \[\int\limits_{?}^{?} (8x^6 - 7x +7) dx\] That is the symbol but there are no numbers at the top or bottom. That was the closest to the symbol I could find on here. I really don't understand how to do this.

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    easy... u integrate all three terms firstly

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    That is what I am having trouble with. I am really lost. My brain is wanting to do derivatives and I don't think these work that way

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    integration of 8x^2= 8x^3/3 7x will be 7x^2/2 and 7 becomes 7x

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    indefinite integral, derp. Antidifferenciate it... if you didn't learn that there is no way the professor would ask it... That symbol is basically asking you to take the reverse of derivation. The area under the curve.

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Where did the 2 come from

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    now u plug in upper limit value - lower limit value

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    x means x raised to the power ..so after integrating u add 1 to it and then dividing it by 2 as well..ok?

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    x means x raised to the power 1

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    He made a mistake. That's 8x^6 bro

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    oh sry that was 8x^6...my bad ...it will become 8x^7/7

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Just want to make sure I understand what I am doing, when there is an exponent, do I add 1 to it and then divide that number???? The 8 in 8x^6 really does nothing at this point, correct?

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    exaxtly , it is the 6 which has to be increased by 1 and divided by

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    someone fan me plss..

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    So will the answer be 8x^7/7 - 7x^2/2 Do I do anything with the 7 at the end that has no x with it

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    +7x

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Oh, something just clicked, the 7 became an 7x because we are taking the derivative back to original problem?.?.? Is that correct?

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yes...

  23. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.