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BuggyBoy99 Group Title

How do you reduce a fraction?

  • 3 years ago
  • 3 years ago

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  1. emunrradtvamg Group Title
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    Try a tutorial online, for example http://www.webmath.com/redfract.html and if you have a question come back and we help you for suere

    • 3 years ago
  2. BuggyBoy99 Group Title
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    Thank you.

    • 3 years ago
  3. polpak Group Title
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    You cancel factors that are common to the numerator and the denominator.

    • 3 years ago
  4. helpme101 Group Title
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    Please view my question

    • 3 years ago
  5. knowak Group Title
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    No, we won't.

    • 3 years ago
  6. BuggyBoy99 Group Title
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    @emunrradtvamg Thank you very much I don't really have anything else but if I do I know you'll help me (If your online).

    • 3 years ago
  7. emunrradtvamg Group Title
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    Sure when I can, I try to help. That is what people are for.

    • 3 years ago
  8. BuggyBoy99 Group Title
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    Cool. Thanks again.

    • 3 years ago
  9. BuggyBoy99 Group Title
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    Can you help me w/ this? Add the following fractions. Be sure to find the common denominator (multiple) and then simplify

    • 3 years ago
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  10. emunrradtvamg Group Title
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    Ok

    • 3 years ago
  11. polpak Group Title
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    Did you find a common denominator for them?

    • 3 years ago
  12. emunrradtvamg Group Title
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    In the first equation (3/16) the only thing to do is to carry out numerical division. So you will end up with 0.1875

    • 3 years ago
  13. BuggyBoy99 Group Title
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    Ok

    • 3 years ago
  14. polpak Group Title
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    No he's got to add two fractions by finding a common denominator, then adding the numerators of the equivalent fractions. Not convert to decimal...

    • 3 years ago
  15. emunrradtvamg Group Title
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    Ok sorry. Just got what you really want. Wait. I definitively know what you want.

    • 3 years ago
  16. BuggyBoy99 Group Title
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    Ok

    • 3 years ago
  17. polpak Group Title
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    Buggy, did you find a common denominator already?

    • 3 years ago
  18. BuggyBoy99 Group Title
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    From what?

    • 3 years ago
  19. polpak Group Title
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    What are the denominators for the fractions you are trying to add?

    • 3 years ago
  20. BuggyBoy99 Group Title
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    3\6 + 5\48

    • 3 years ago
  21. polpak Group Title
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    Those are the fractions (except it's 3/16). which part of the fraction is the denominator?

    • 3 years ago
  22. BuggyBoy99 Group Title
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    Oh ok. ?

    • 3 years ago
  23. emunrradtvamg Group Title
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    Ok now Im gonna teach you how to get the common denominator.

    • 3 years ago
  24. polpak Group Title
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    \[\frac{Numerator}{Denominator}\]

    • 3 years ago
  25. BuggyBoy99 Group Title
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    Ok.

    • 3 years ago
  26. polpak Group Title
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    The part on bottom is the denominator.

    • 3 years ago
  27. BuggyBoy99 Group Title
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    Ok.

    • 3 years ago
  28. polpak Group Title
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    So now, what are the two denominators you are working with?

    • 3 years ago
  29. BuggyBoy99 Group Title
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    16 and 48.

    • 3 years ago
  30. BuggyBoy99 Group Title
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    Is that right?

    • 3 years ago
  31. polpak Group Title
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    Correct. Now, we are looking for common multiplies of those two numbers. So what are the multiples of 16?

    • 3 years ago
  32. BuggyBoy99 Group Title
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    16, 32, 48, 64, 80, 96, 112, 128, 144, 160, 176, 192, 208, 224, 240, 256, 272, 288, 304,

    • 3 years ago
  33. polpak Group Title
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    Did you figure that out? or type it in somewhere?

    • 3 years ago
  34. BuggyBoy99 Group Title
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    Right?

    • 3 years ago
  35. polpak Group Title
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    Do you see any multiples of 48 in that list?

    • 3 years ago
  36. BuggyBoy99 Group Title
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    Yes

    • 3 years ago
  37. polpak Group Title
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    What is the smallest multiple of 48 you see there?

    • 3 years ago
  38. BuggyBoy99 Group Title
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    3?

    • 3 years ago
  39. emunrradtvamg Group Title
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    Ok the first thing you have to do is to divide the two numbers (16 and 48) in the denominator by 2. If they both are divisible by 2, then you save this number 2. Next, you have to devide the remaining of the last divison by two again. the new two numbers are 8 and 26. If both numbers are divisible by 2 again. You save this number (2) again. 16 48 * .---------- 8 26 * 2 This number is saved 4 13 * 2 This number is saved too * Of course the remaining numbers are not divisible by 2 nor 3, and so on. This means the the common denominator is 2*2 =4 Question? Remember this is the first step

    • 3 years ago
  40. polpak Group Title
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    48 is the smallest multiple that 16 and 48 have in common.

    • 3 years ago
  41. BuggyBoy99 Group Title
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    Ok...

    • 3 years ago
  42. BuggyBoy99 Group Title
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    So what do I do w/ the 48?

    • 3 years ago
  43. polpak Group Title
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    So 16 * 3 = 48. Now we need to make both of the fractions have that denominator. Since 5/48 already has that for the denominator we don't need to change it.

    • 3 years ago
  44. polpak Group Title
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    So you can just write 5/48 on the next column over. But to make 3/16 have a denominator of 48, we need to multiply the bottom by 3. In order to do that and keep the ratio the same, we must also multiply the top by 3.

    • 3 years ago
  45. BuggyBoy99 Group Title
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    ? you lost me....

    • 3 years ago
  46. polpak Group Title
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    \[\frac{3}{48} * \frac{3}{3} = ?\]

    • 3 years ago
  47. polpak Group Title
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    Err. \[\frac{3}{16} * \frac{3}{3}\]

    • 3 years ago
  48. polpak Group Title
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    We need to change the denominator of the 3/16 so it is also using our lowest common denominator.

    • 3 years ago
  49. polpak Group Title
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    We can multiply any number by 1 without changing it. Since 3/3 = 1, we can multiply our fraction by 3/3 and it will still have the same value.

    • 3 years ago
  50. polpak Group Title
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    But now it will have 48 for a denominator.

    • 3 years ago
  51. BuggyBoy99 Group Title
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    Hold on.... Let's move on to a different question...

    • 3 years ago
  52. polpak Group Title
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    If you are having trouble with this still I suggest this video: http://www.khanacademy.org/video/adding-fractions-with-unlike-denominators?playlist=Developmental%20Math

    • 3 years ago
  53. BuggyBoy99 Group Title
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    Ok...

    • 3 years ago
  54. polpak Group Title
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    He explains very well the process for doing this.

    • 3 years ago
  55. BuggyBoy99 Group Title
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    Ok...

    • 3 years ago
  56. *_Artist_* Group Title
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    (Including mine,) You have 56 replies!

    • 3 years ago
  57. knowak Group Title
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    You can divide both numerator and denominator by the greatest common divisor of the two. ;-)

    • 3 years ago
  58. BuggyBoy99 Group Title
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    Cool thanks..

    • 3 years ago
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