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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

expand using the properties of logarithms: log5 y(x+2)/x^4

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    when expanding a logarithm when two terms are being multiplied together the sum of the logarithm of the two taken seperately is equal for example log base 5 of x(y) is equal to log base 5 of x + log base 5 of y

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    when a term is being divided then you use the difference of the log with the same base for example log base 5 of x/y is equal to log base 5 of x - log base 5 of y

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    does that help?

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    \[\log5 y(x+2)/x^4 = \log5 y(x+2) - \log5x^4 = \log5y+\log5(x+2) - 4\log5x\]

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    im so lost

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    bubbamurphy your answer gets cut off

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Sorry the above reply got cut out. \[\log5y(x+2) - \log5x^4 = \log5y + \log5(x+2) - 4\log5x\]

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    The righthand side of that last post should be your final answer (assuming by log5 you meant base 5)

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    and yes then you move the power to the front

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    as bubbamurphy did

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    when two or multiple things are being multiplied together in the same log you can separate them with addition when they are being divided then you may use subtraction

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i did thankyou

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    -4log5x is my answer?

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    the whole left side of the equation that bubbamurphy posted is your completed answer

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    *right side

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    sorry

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    no thankyou allot

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    no problem any other questions while i am here?

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    expand the expression: log3(x^-2y^3)

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    \[\log3(x^(-2y^3) = -2y^3\log3x\]

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    what is above the first x?

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    the way that you wrote the problem x was to the power of -2y^3

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so if x is to the power of that entire quantity you can move that quantity to the front of the logarithm

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    quantity meaning -2y^3

  26. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    that is a parenthesis above the first x

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    there should be a end parenthesis after the -2y^3

  28. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thankyou for your help

  29. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    No problem. :)

  30. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    do you have time for more?

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