anonymous
  • anonymous
anyone with differential geometry insights and how the vetors in the ocullating planes are used, let me know something.
Mathematics
katieb
  • katieb
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anonymous
  • anonymous
working a little with this this semester
anonymous
  • anonymous
yeah, you're working with the vectors in cal III but nothing really in how they apply to differential geometry.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Well share your question. I meet with a math phd once a week. He likes to be challenged.

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anonymous
  • anonymous
just what general uses could be for generating the ocullating plane and the normal, tangent, and binormal vectors might be within differential geometry. I thought maybe in some circumstances they could be used almost like an xyz reference. In general, wht kind of situations come up in differential geometry. I know that they use the oscullating planes and vectors, but for what and how outside of space curves isn't clear. I'm convinced that alot of natural phenomena has to be explained through differential geometry, but gaining access to those who have some insights to the field is more difficult. It's just an in general question. I know there are some knowledgeable people on here. I know know for sure differential geometry deals with the rates of change of curves, but to what end?
anonymous
  • anonymous
If you are walking in a room, the xyz plane is no longer of important to you, the frenet eq is your new reference. Let's see what Donylee has to say about it http://www.youtube.com/user/donylee#p/c/43F68F201A16C49A/28/KHCSPgW7dfg

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