A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • 5 years ago

The table lists data regarding the average salaries of several professional athletes in the years 1991 and 2001. a) Use the data points to find a linear function that fits the data . b) Use the function to predict the average salary in 2005 and 2010. Year 1991 the average salary is 269,000 year 2010 the average salary is 1,390,000

  • This Question is Closed
  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Treat this as a linear equation (y=mx+b). The year is your x value, and the salary is your y-value, so you really have two ordered pairs - (1991, 269000) and (2010, 1390000). Use these to find the slope (m) of your line.

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Once you have the slope, then use the values from one of the ordered pairs to find the y-intercept (b).

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I need to solve the linear function that fits data S(x)= And then predicted the average salary for 2005 and 2010?

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Is the data you listed above all of the data that is given?

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yes sir!

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Then what I said above should work, though your equation will take the form S(x)=mx+b, since it is supposed to be a function. Use the ordered pairs to find the slope (change in y value over change in x value).

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Plug the two points into the slope formula to find the slope of the linear function. Then plug the slope and one of the points into the point slope formula: \[y-y_1 = m(x-x_1)\] Where \((x_1,y_1)\) is one of your points and m is the slope.

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    That make no scence to me at all.....!

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Ok, do you know the formula for the slope if you have 2 points?

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    x1 and y2 over x2 and y2 but it is hard for to get the answer

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    That's not quite right. \[\frac{y_2-y_1}{x_2-x1} = Slope\]

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    So plug in the salaries as y2 and y1 and the years as x2 and x1. Make sure you keep them consistent, so the salary for one year is y2 then that year must be x2.

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    And then post what you get for slope

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    11,210,000 over 19

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    You have an extra 0 there. Should be 1,121,000 over 19

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Ok, so now plug in that slope, along with one of your two points into the point slope formula.

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yea sry so the answer is 1,121,000 over 19 is s(x)?

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    No, that's the slope of your line.

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Now you plug in that slope along with one of your points into the point slope formula: \[y-y_1 = m(x-x_1)\] Where \(x_1,y_1\) are the x and y values of your point, and m is the slope.

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I am lost!!!! SRY

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    You have the slope. The slope is m. you have 2 points. Pick one.

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I am not good at this type of question

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Which point do you want to use?

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    269,000

  26. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    That's a salary, the point would be (1991,269,000)

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    1991

  28. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Where 1991 is your \(x_1\) and 269,000 is your \(y_1\). Plug them into the equation and plug in the slope you found for m. That will give you the equation for the line which represents the salary over time.

  29. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so what is s(x)= then

  30. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    After you plug it in, s(x) = y

  31. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I also have to predict the salary for 2005 and 2010?

  32. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Which you can do easily once you have the formula. Have you plugged it in yet?

  33. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so you have 1,120,000/9=124,444

  34. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    No.

  35. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    1,120,000/19=58,947

  36. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I am so confused!!!!

  37. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    You picked your point, so you should have \[y - 269,000 = \frac{1,121,000}{19}(x - 1991)\]

  38. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    well 1,121,000 / 19=59,000

  39. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Solving for s(x) = y we have: \[ s(x) = y = \frac{1}{19}(1,121,000x -2226800000)\]

  40. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok

  41. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    So that's the equation for the salary at a given year x.

  42. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    You want to know the salary at 2010, plug that in for x, and see what y is.

  43. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    or s(x), whichever you prefer.

  44. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    2,030,530,000

  45. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    26,410,000 to many zero when working

  46. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    2010 would be 26,410,000 and 2005 would be 20,805,000

  47. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I am sorry if I am causing you grief I am just bad at these problem.

  48. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.