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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

Find the equation of the line perpendicular to the line containing (-2, 4) with slope zero, going through (-2, 4). What's the slope? I'm confused.

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Hehe...draw it.

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    First line goes through (-2,4) and is horizontal. Second line goes through the same point and is perpendicular (i.e. vertical). It's slope is 'infinity'.

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    The slope is defined as\[m=\frac{y_2-y_1}{x_2-x_1}\]For the horizontal line, you have that it has the same y-value for ANY x value, so the slope is\[m=\frac{y-y}{x_2-x_1}=\frac{0}{x_2-x_1}=0\]but

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    for the second line, the vertical one, it has the same x-value for ALL y-values, so you end up with\[m=\lim_{x_0 \rightarrow x}\left| \frac{y_2-y_1}{x_0-x} \right|=\infty\]

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    because you end up dividing by zero (just put numbers into your calculator where you hold the numerator fixed and let the denominator get closer and closer to zero, and you'll see the result gets larger and larger.

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    My first equation I have is y=4 which is horizontal right? How do I make my second equation to show what you are showing me?

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    x=-2

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    x=-2 means, "x is -2 for all y".

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Oh okay, this is the case because both of the points are the same, correct?

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Which points are you talking about?

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Both lines share only one point. The horizontal line has different x for same y. The vertical has same x for different y.

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    it seems it is only asking for one slope? You are getting two aren't you?

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    You're being asked for the slope of the line perpendicular to the line with slope zero. This perpendicular line is the vertical one, and it has the (technically undefined, and therefore non-existent) slope of infinity.

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Look at what I'm about to send.

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    http://mathforum.org/library/drmath/view/57310.html

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    The slope of the line is also the tan of the angle subtended between the positive x-axis and the line (i.e. tan(theta) since by definition of tan, tan is opposite over adjacent). The tan function 'blows up' as you go to theta = 90 degrees...plot it...check it out. Use wolframalpha.com or download this free software: http://www.geogebra.org/cms/

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    well we have not really got that far, I appreciate your help. I understand a lot better. So basically the equation of the line is y=4? because you also have x=-2 and it says THE so he is only asking for one.

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    SOOO the equation of the line perpendicular is x=-2 while the slope does not exist or is infinite. Right?

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Yes, to your last post.

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